Posts Tagged ‘Spokane’

Staff Spotlight, Krista Kubiak Crotty

Krista Kubiak Crotty

TEP: Tell us about yourself!

Krista: I’m Krista Kubiak Crotty, and I’m currently the Director of Brain Based Therapies and a Clinical Education Specialist (my title is always changing!). I work remotely now but live in Spokane, Washington.

I have been with The Emily Program for just over seven years. Funny story: My first introduction to TEP was the day my youngest son was born. Just hours after he was born, the marketing person called me to see if I would meet with Jillian Lampert the following week when she was in town to discuss the potential of TEP-Spokane. We were in the midst of talking to family and friends when she called. I did actually go and meet Jillian a few weeks later. My son was about 2 weeks old when I first met Jillian and the TEP crew who were looking to expand to Spokane.

Read more

Staff Spotlight, Sharon Koch

Staff spotlight, Sharon Koch

TEP: Tell us about yourself!

Sharon: I’m 49 (I feel 12. . .) and happily married for 16 years to my wonderful husband Eric. We have two grown daughters, Allix and Liz. I’m an animal lover and have three dogs and one cat (Jack, Wilson, Shorty, and Shelby). I’ve lived in Spokane since I was a little girl. We enjoy camping, boating, and 4-wheeling at our property at Lake Roosevelt. I also love to spend time running, planting flowers, reading, and hiking with my dogs.

Read more

Staff Spotlight: Dee Myers, Therapist

Dee staff spotlight

Dee joined The Emily Program team at the opening of the Spokane location in the summer of 2013. She was thrilled to see this type of eating disorder treatment resource right in her town. She spent more than 15 years in private practice specializing in eating disorders, but longed to work for a treatment center.

Read more

Intensive Outpatient Program for Binge Eating Disorder in Spokane

Spokane BED Program

Binge eating disorder is the most prevalent eating disorder in the US, affecting an estimated 3-5% American adults. Binge eating disorder can have serious consequences, including cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure/cholesterol, adult onset diabetes, social isolation, anxiety, and depression. However, many of those impacted do not receive treatment. 

Read more

The Emily Program Logo