Posts Tagged ‘Research’

The Broad Response to Evidence-Based Treatment

Re-posted from the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives and updated with additional Emily Program client thoughts. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.  Contributions by Sarah Emerman.

Harriet Brown, well known to readers of this blog and to the eating disorder community for her book Brave Girl Eating, recently published an article in the New York Times on why evidence-based care is so rarely used in the field of mental health and psychology. Her article is the latest in what has become a very important conversation about the translation of evidence-based research into the treatment of mental illness.

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What You May Have Missed at “Body Beautiful”

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

Our expert panel answers your questions about body image and eating disorders.

Thanks to those of you who joined us on Monday at “Body Beautiful,” presented by Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders and John Carroll University. We had a great turnout! Students, professors, eating disorder professionals, and families came out to increase awareness and promote hope around body image issues and eating disorders.

The event, which ran in conjunction with National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, featured a student interactive art show, “Mirror Images” and a screening of the popular documentary, “America the Beautiful.” Immediately following, our expert panel was there to answer questions from the audience.

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Recent Maudsley FBT Research

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

A recent article in the International Journal of Eating Disorders by Couturier, Kimber, and Szatmari (2013) adds to the literature on the effectiveness of Maudsley Family Based Therapy (FBT). Their conclusion is that while FBT does not show superiority to other therapies during treatment, there are significant benefits at the 6 -12 month follow up. These benefits reach a level of significance that would cause one to recommend FBT for the treatment of eating disorders in adolescents instead of individual therapy. As they discuss in their article, there are multiple limitations to this study, however, research literature has long pointed to the superiority of FBT over individual therapy. This article, therefore, adds to a growing body of data.

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What Do We Mean By Causation?

Straws

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

Often times while in treatment clients wonder how and why their eating disorder developed. The common question “What caused my eating disorder?” is very complicated because it pulls from so many ideas, understandings, conceptions, and misconceptions about the importance of causation, the implication of causation, and the definition of what causation means.

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Biology and Eating Disorders

Stethoscope

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Mark Warren, MD

The book Eating Disorders and the Brain edited by Drs Lask and Frampton continues to be an extraordinarily important book to understanding the etiology of eating disorders. Given our current knowledge, we often say that eating disorders are biologically based. Yet, this is somewhat of a two-dimensional statement as eating disorders are experienced as complex and multifactorial.

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The Importance of Early and Aggressive Treatment

Health

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

A recent study by Dr. Janet Treasure, one of the world’s most prominent eating disorder researchers, has demonstrated the significant importance of early and aggressive treatment for anorexia nervosa. In her study, regardless of the treatment mechanism, patients who had been ill for longer than three years had significantly worse outcomes after treatment then those who had been ill for less time. Give the lack of evidence-based treatment available until ten years ago, we do not know if the current treatment mechanism may be more effective for those who have been ill longer. However, we can certainly say that based on this study, the faster someone gets into treatment and the more aggressive the treatment, clients are faster into recovery and less likely to relapse.

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