Posts Tagged ‘Research’

How Eating Disorders Affect the Neurobiology of the Brain

brain

Our physical and mental health, relationships, and day-to-day life are all affected and challenged by disordered eating habits’ pervasive nature. When someone suffers from an eating disorder, the risk of health consequences, such as brain damage, could occur. Disrupted eating behaviors negatively affect adequate nutrition absorption; thus, the brain does not get the nutrients it needs to function properly. This is especially concerning in adolescents, as brain development occurs through early adulthood – meaning that significant periods of growth could be disrupted.

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Examining Emotion Regulation in Patients with Anorexia

Words

By Lucene Wisniewski, PhD

Without effective treatment, eating disorders can be chronic and life-threatening. Therefore as patients, we should be well-informed consumers of the treatment we receive. In fact, being armed with accurate information about what constitutes best practices in treatment could be the difference between life and death.

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Purging Disorder: The Basics

The following post was written by K. Jean Forney, M.S., a Doctoral Candidate in Clinical Psychology at Florida State University. Her interest lies in research for purging disorder. You can read more about her and her research here.

Within the realm of eating disorders there are so many varying factors and potential risks for those who struggle. Research-based treatment can help people get better and live full, healthy lives. In addition, it’s important for us, as a general population, to understand that eating disorders, no matter the exact diagnosis, are incredibly dangerous. They are not a choice and they affect over 14 million people in the United States.

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A Review of Eating Disorders and the Brain

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014. Contributions by Sarah Emerman.

One of the most exciting books to recently be published on eating disorders is the book Eating Disorders and the Brain by Drs Bryan Lask and Ian Frampton. A review of the book was recently published by Dr. Joel Yager, a prominent psychiatrist in the eating disorder field. Dr. Yager describes 2 parts of the book which I thought to be extraordinarily important. The first is an early chapter in the book by David Wood on why clinicians should love and appreciate neuroscience. This discussion, which focuses on free will, determinism, how the presentation of an eating disorder makes one think about philosophical, clinical, and medical issues is critically important. This chapter also discusses past assumptions and questions around the origins of eating disorders including genes, attachment theory, cultural theories, social adversity, family issues, maturation, issues of neural networks, and how all of these issues can be seen not as etiologic factors but as factors that must be considered while treating these complex disorders. By moving beyond etiology into understanding complexity, he makes a tremendous contribution to the conceptualization of these illnesses.

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The Need for Evidence-Based Care

Re-posted from the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives and updated with additional Emily Program client thoughts. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.  Contributions by Sarah Emerman,

A recent article by Dr. Russell Marx, The National Eating Disorder Association’s chief science officer, discussed evidence-based treatment. The article noted Harriet Brown’s New York Times piece, which we have discussed in previous blogs, concerning why surprisingly few patients get evidence-based care. Dr. Marx discusses the NICE guidelines, which is the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom. What’s particularly exciting about this article was that it noted the growing evidence for the efficacy of FBT and general family-based interventions for clients with anorexia. The NICE guidelines are of significance specifically in the United Kingdom but are utilized worldwide in understanding evidence basis for eating disorder treatment. In the NICE guidelines, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is noted as a treatment well conducted with clinical studies for binge eating disorder, but is not included as a proven treatment for anorexia or bulimia. These guidelines were last completed in 2011 and will be reviewed again in 2014. It is our hope that recent studies on DBT will show the effectiveness of this treatment for other eating disorder diagnoses.

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Parent Conversations and Adolescent Disordered Eating Behaviors

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

Last month, JAMA Pediatrics published a recent study, “Parent Conversations About Healthful Eating and Weight: Associations with adolescent disordered eating behaviors.” The study examined the associations between parent conversations about healthful eating, weight and adolescent disordered eating behaviors.

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