Posts Tagged ‘Research’

What Do Genetics Have To Do with Eating Disorders?

DNA

A common fact shared with clients and their families is that eating disorders are genetic. When we use terms like “genetic,” it often makes people wonder exactly how this illness might be inherited, especially if no close family members have the same illness. It also may make a parent wonder if there are hidden genetic factors that he/she passed onto the child, which could make a parent feel responsible for causing this illness.

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Athletes and Eating Disorders

Orange graphic about athletes

Female and Male Athletes are Susceptible to Disordered Eating

While sports and exercise are excellent ways to improve mental and physical health, grow self-esteem, and build relationships, the fact that athletes carry risk factors for disordered eating is one that shouldn’t be ignored. What makes athletes vulnerable to eating disorders? What should coaches, trainers, parents, and peers look out for?

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Eating Disorders Are Not a Teenage Phase

Teenagers

Acknowledging the facts about eating disorders

In the not-so-distant past, eating disorders weren’t recognized by society – or even some medical professionals – as legitimate diseases. In fact, binge eating disorder wasn’t added to the eating disorder portion of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) until 2013, despite being the most common eating disorder in the United States.

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Family-Based Therapy (FBT) Family Meals

Words

By Lucene Wisniewski, chief clinical officer

“How do Parents of Adolescent Patients with Anorexia Nervosa Interact with their Child at Mealtimes? A study of Parental Strategies used in the Family Meal Session of FBT.” International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol 48, issue 1, p. 72-80 White, Haycraft, Madden, Rhodes, Miskovic-Wheatley, Wallis, Kohn & Meyer (2015)

This recent study examined the types of parental mealtime strategies used during a family meal session of Family-Based Therapy (FBT). Researchers studied 21 families with children between the ages of 12 to 18 who were receiving FBT for anorexia nervosa. They also were interested in the emotional tone of the meal, as well as the parents’ ability to get their child to eat.

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Eating Disorders and Low Heart Rate

By Mark Warren, MD, Chief Medical Officer, The Emily Program

An important topic that comes up relatively frequently with my patients in eating disorder treatment is whether those with low heart rates are at risk. The answer is absolutely yes. A low heart rate is a very significant risk and requires immediate attention.

There is a belief held by some that low heart rates are normal – and safe – in adolescents who are athletes. However, this is not supported by evidence and, in fact, it is almost certainly untrue.

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