Posts Tagged ‘Professional Development’

Questions You Should Ask Every Patient About Their Relationship With Food

A doctor in a telehealth session

You’re invited!

Whether in-person or virtually, you’re invited to assess, assess, assess! In school, we clinicians are taught to ask questions—so many questions. We are taught to ask about our patients’ history, about their current happenings, and about their future hopes and dreams. We are taught to ask about easy things and hard things. We are taught to ask about things that aren’t socially appropriate, things that are extremely uncomfortable outside the confines of medical and mental health settings. We are trained to ask questions about substance use, depression, anxiety, suicide, sexual behaviors, and peculiarities of the human body and its functioning.

Yet, so often, we forget to ask questions about one of the things that sustains life: FOOD! We know that to survive we need to eat. From the moment of conception to the moment of death, we are required to consume, in some way, calories that feed and nourish the systems within the body. Why, then, do we shy away from asking questions about this life-giving, life-sustaining human behavior?

Anecdotally, I hear medical and mental health providers say, “We have never had training,” “I don’t know what to ask,” and “I’m not sure what to do if it seems as though there might be a problem.” However, in the same way that we all learned how to ask and how to respond or intervene following questions about suicidal ideation or even substance use, we all can become more comfortable with integrating questions about eating disorders into our assessments of 100% of our patients.

Read more

Eating Disorder Signs to Watch for in Your Patients Over the Holidays

Doctor and patient talking

For those living with an eating disorder, the holidays may be the toughest time of the year. Holidays are often synonymous with large amounts of food, increased stress, and extended periods of time with family—which are all factors that can exacerbate eating disorder symptoms. Because eating disorder thoughts and behaviors can increase during the holidays, it’s important to be especially vigilant of your patients this time of year.

There are many common signs and symptoms healthcare providers should look for that denote the presence of an eating disorder. During the holidays, certain symptoms may become more noticeable, specifically the following:

Read more

When to Refer a Patient to Specialty Care

Mark with client

One of the questions that providers often have is, “When should I refer a patient to eating disorder specialty care?” A provider may ask this if they are seeing a patient that has eating disorder symptoms such as changes in weight, a preoccupation with food and numbers, and other common symptoms. A provider may also see things in physical exams or lab results that cause concern. The bottom line is that if you are concerned that there is an eating disorder present in a patient, there almost positively is. Eating disorders live in secret and in hiding. If the eating disorder symptoms are noticeable to a provider, then the patient’s eating disorder has most likely been there for a while and may pose an immediate risk. 

Read more

What is the best treatment at any given time when recovering from an eating disorder?

By: Mark Warren, MD, chief medical officer at The Emily Program

What is the best treatment at any given time when recovering from an eating disorder? This is one of the great questions providers, clients, and families alike struggle to answer.

We know there are significant scientifically based therapies that deliver positive outcomes, including weight restoration and behavior cessation. In fact, The Emily Program incorporates these therapies in our programs — Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and Family-Based Therapy — and has experienced much success through them.

Having said that, however, we also know that many clients who are able to cease behaviors and achieve weight restoration may continue to experience physiological distress, urges, body dissatisfaction, and anxiety, among other eating disorder symptoms.

Further complicating the issue, eating disorders often occur in secret and many clients may not reveal the intensity of their behaviors, thoughts and feelings during treatment.

Read more

Stay Up To Date With The Emily Program

At The Emily Program we’re committed to:

  • providing the best eating disorder treatment to our clients and families,
  • improving and growing the programs and services we offer,
  • staying current within the eating disorders, mental health, and healthcare fields,
  • learning more about and adjusting our research-based practices to fit client needs as well as sharing our lessons and knowledge with other professionals.

We have an incredible amount of useful and exciting information to share about all of these things.

Read more

Eating Disorder Education in the Community

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

I co-taught a day-long conference at the Gestalt Institute a few weeks ago on eating disorders, the science behind them, when to refer, and when to treat. It’s a topic that forms the core of the work we do and is very dear to my heart. The participants at the conference were a terrific group.

Read more

The Emily Program Logo