Posts Tagged ‘Ohio’

Diagnosing an Eating Disorder in an Overweight Teen

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

The DSM V has brought formal recognition to a significant issue in those with eating disorders that have been previously excluded. The disorder “atypical anorexia” describes an individual who meet the criteria for anorexia, however despite significant weight loss the individual’s weight is within or above the normal range.

Read more

Gratitude for Primary Care Physicians

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

Over the past few weeks, I have started rounding on a pediatric inpatient unit with Drs Gillespie and Rome, adolescent medicine specialists who we are privileged to work closely with. It has been a new experience for me to work with patients at the medical inpatient level of care.

Read more

The Need for Evidence-Based Care

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

A recent article by Dr. Russell Marx, The National Eating Disorder Association’s chief science officer, discussed evidence-based treatment. The article noted Harriet Brown’s New York Times piece, which we have discussed in previous blogs, concerning why surprisingly few patients get evidence-based care. Dr. Marx discusses the NICE guidelines, which is the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom. What’s particularly exciting about this article was that it noted the growing evidence for the efficacy of FBT and general family-based interventions for clients with anorexia. The NICE guidelines are of significance specifically in the United Kingdom but are utilized worldwide in understanding evidence basis for eating disorder treatment. In the NICE guidelines Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is noted as a treatment well conducted with clinical studies for binge eating disorder, but is not included as a proven treatment for anorexia or bulimia. These guidelines were last completed in 2011 and will be reviewed again in 2014. It is our hope that recent studies on DBT will show the effectiveness of this treatment for other eating disorder diagnoses.

Read more

Validation

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Samantha Mishne, LISW, LICDC

Recently a client kept telling me how invalidating I was. Instead of getting defensive and saying all the things I was thinking in my head which I knew were not validating, I took a validation course. Recently when I was taking an online training the facilitator and a colleague both commented on how validating I was. I share this because it just goes to show when you take in feedback you can teach an old dog new tricks. Given this feedback, I am going to stop invalidating myself and start validating myself by telling people, “I am validating.” Remember you can validate others and yourself.

Read more

Parent Conversations and Adolescent Disordered Eating Behaviors

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

Last month, JAMA Pediatrics published a recent study, “Parent Conversations About Healthful Eating and Weight: Associations with adolescent disordered eating behaviors.” The study examined the associations between parent conversations about healthful eating, weight and adolescent disordered eating behaviors.

Read more

Radical Truth

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

One of the saddest and complicated components of an eating disorder is how it encourages secrets. Behaviors, negative thoughts, feelings of shame, and the pain one carries often happen in secret. By the time someone presents for treatment they are so familiar and so used to keeping secrets that it can be very difficult to tell the truth.

Read more

The Emily Program Logo