Posts Tagged ‘Education’

The Residential Eating Disorders Consortium Introduces STEP

Interlocked hands

The Emily Program is pleased to announce that the Residential Eating Disorders Consortium (REDC) has released the Standards of Excellence Project (STEP), a collection of works demonstrating REDC’s continued commitment to raising eating disorder industry standards.

What is the REDC?

Founded in 2011, the Residential Eating Disorders Consortium (REDC) is the only national professional association for eating disorder treatment providers. The REDC represents the majority of eating disorder industry leaders, with roughly 80% of treatment programs as members (including The Emily Program!). With this network of field leaders, the REDC raises the bar for industry standards and professionalism by offering members a seat at the table for the most critical discussions in the industry. Members of the REDC learn from each other and share resources, advancing eating disorder treatment across America.

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Owning My Story

nourishment is my birthright sign

This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

Rebecca Witt is a former client of The Emily Program. She was born in India and lives in Olympia. She is a mother, educator, and photographer. She has her BA in addiction recovery and plans to become a trauma therapist. Her favorite color is glitter and gold. This is her first blog for The Emily Program and she hopes it helps to inspire others to break open and let their light shine.

When I fall short of finding words and when nothing else makes sense, I often turn to Brené Brown, a well-known author, researcher, and storyteller. One of my favorite quotes is:

“Owning our story can be hard but not nearly as difficult as spending our lives running from it. Embracing our vulnerabilities is risky but not nearly as dangerous as giving up on love and belonging and joy—the experiences that make us the most vulnerable. Only when we are brave enough to explore the darkness will we discover the infinite power of our light.” Brené Brown

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Emily Program Dietitian Honored as an Outstanding Preceptor

Kelsey Thomas, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist at our Seattle outpatient location, earned an outstanding preceptor award from the University of Washington for her work educating and supervising dietetic interns. 

“To be selected for this award shows the success of my intern!” said Kelsey. “Teaching is one of my passions and I’m so proud I get the opportunity to be a preceptor so I can pass along the gift of my expertise and knowledge like my preceptors did when I was an intern.”

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Eating Disorder Education in the Community

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

I co-taught a day-long conference at the Gestalt Institute a few weeks ago on eating disorders, the science behind them, when to refer, and when to treat. It’s a topic that forms the core of the work we do and is very dear to my heart. The participants at the conference were a terrific group.

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A Review of Eating Disorders and the Brain

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014. Contributions by Sarah Emerman.

One of the most exciting books to recently be published on eating disorders is the book Eating Disorders and the Brain by Drs Bryan Lask and Ian Frampton. A review of the book was recently published by Dr. Joel Yager, a prominent psychiatrist in the eating disorder field. Dr. Yager describes 2 parts of the book which I thought to be extraordinarily important. The first is an early chapter in the book by David Wood on why clinicians should love and appreciate neuroscience. This discussion, which focuses on free will, determinism, how the presentation of an eating disorder makes one think about philosophical, clinical, and medical issues is critically important. This chapter also discusses past assumptions and questions around the origins of eating disorders including genes, attachment theory, cultural theories, social adversity, family issues, maturation, issues of neural networks, and how all of these issues can be seen not as etiologic factors but as factors that must be considered while treating these complex disorders. By moving beyond etiology into understanding complexity, he makes a tremendous contribution to the conceptualization of these illnesses.

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The Need for Evidence-Based Care

Re-posted from the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives and updated with additional Emily Program client thoughts. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.  Contributions by Sarah Emerman,

A recent article by Dr. Russell Marx, The National Eating Disorder Association’s chief science officer, discussed evidence-based treatment. The article noted Harriet Brown’s New York Times piece, which we have discussed in previous blogs, concerning why surprisingly few patients get evidence-based care. Dr. Marx discusses the NICE guidelines, which is the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom. What’s particularly exciting about this article was that it noted the growing evidence for the efficacy of FBT and general family-based interventions for clients with anorexia. The NICE guidelines are of significance specifically in the United Kingdom but are utilized worldwide in understanding evidence basis for eating disorder treatment. In the NICE guidelines, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is noted as a treatment well conducted with clinical studies for binge eating disorder but is not included as a proven treatment for anorexia or bulimia. These guidelines were last completed in 2011 and will be reviewed again in 2014. It is our hope that recent studies on DBT will show the effectiveness of this treatment for other eating disorder diagnoses.

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