Posts Tagged ‘Eating Disorders’

What Does Recovery Mean?

Woman enjoying food

The question of what constitutes recovery from an eating disorder is one that has been debated in many places by many people. Providers, families, and clients often have different perspectives, and there is a wide spectrum of beliefs within each of these groups. A key reason for this is that eating disorders have distinct physical and psychological manifestations

The physical manifestations of eating disorders are usually what drive people to the highest level of care. That is because these manifestations often carry an immediate risk to one’s physical health and require intensive clinical support. Recovery from physical manifestations is very important, but it does not constitute full recovery.

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The Emily Program – Columbus Opens Its Doors!

The Emily Program - Columbus

We’re thrilled to announce that The Emily Program – Columbus is now open! This location offers individual and group outpatient therapy and intensive programs for all ages, genders, and eating disorder diagnoses.

The opening comes after The Center for Balanced Living transitioned its services to The Emily Program to improve and sustain access to quality eating disorder care in Central Ohio. The Center for Balanced Living will continue as a non-profit with the mission of community education and advocacy aimed at raising awareness and reducing the stigma of eating disorders. Both The Center and The Emily Program will now be housed at the Columbus location.

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Teenagers and Eating Disorders

Group of teenagers walking on sidewalk

We know that eating disorders can and do affect people of all ages.

They’re not a “teenage phase.” They’re not a “teenager’s problem.” They’re mental health conditions that impact children and adults as well.

We also know that teenagers are particularly susceptible to developing these illnesses. Research shows that the average age of onset is between 16 and 18 years, and eating disorders occur in nearly three percent of 13- to 18-year-olds.

It’s clear that eating disorders often develop during the adolescent and teenage years—but why?

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Cardiac Complications of Eating Disorders

Stethoscope with red heart

By Dr. Mary Bretzman, physician at The Emily Program

“Why an EKG?”

“Why do you check my blood pressure lying down AND standing up?”

“Why am I dizzy when I stand?”

We often hear these questions from our clients with eating disorders. The answer? Because eating disorders can affect every part of the body, including the heart. Cardiac complications may occur as a result of the malnutrition, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalances commonly associated with these disorders.

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“Come As You Are” This National Eating Disorders Awareness Week

Twin Cities, MN NEDA Walk 2020

Your recovery is valid and important, even if:

You don’t need to restore your weight.
You don’t need inpatient or residential treatment.
Or you do need treatment for the 2nd, 3rd, or 19th time.
You never felt “ready” to recover, or you did and then you didn’t.
You can think of 1001 other things you “should” do first.
Besides, you’re not sure you’re “sick enough” anyway.

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What Does Compulsive Overeating Feel Like?

Woman opening refrigerator

It is normal to overeat from time to time.

Perhaps you order the pecan sundae when you’re already full from the restaurant’s main course. You empty a bag of chocolates from the clearance Valentine’s aisle, or celebrate your daughter’s birthday with party treats and snacks galore. You eat a box of Girl Scout cookies in one sitting because you just “can’t leave them alone.”

Given this occasional overeating, you might assume you know what compulsive overeating feels like. Overly full? Stuffed. Your pants are tight, and for a moment you wish you hadn’t taken that last bite. Your next meal or snack may be lighter.

But compulsive overeating is more than eating too much.

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