Posts Tagged ‘Cleveland’

Words with Wisniewski: Research Review — Focus on Perfectionism in Female Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

Words with Wisniewski

Article: Focus on Perfectionism in Female Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa. International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol 48:7 936-941. Hurst & Zimmer-Gembeck, 2015

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a difficult illness to recover from for a number of reasons. First and foremost, it’s life-threatening and secondly, the treatments available do not yield high success rates and are in need of improvement.

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Eating Disorders are Tough. Let’s End the Stigma.

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By Mark Warren, MD

I have often wondered why there are so many stigmas around eating disorders. People tend to engage in eating disordered behaviors, whether it’s bingeing, purging, compulsive exercise or significant food restriction, when they are alone. There is something so profound about this disease that behaviors can only be done in secret.

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The Neuroplasticity of the Brain

Brain graphic, blue

In the last 10 years, the notion that eating disorders are biologically based illnesses has begun to gain significant traction both inside and outside the eating disorder community.

Following “The Decade of the Brain” in the ’90s and the explosion of research in brain chemistry, anatomy and function, we now better understand how we are susceptible to eating disorders based on a pre-existing neurological status and how our personalities, behaviors and experiences in eating disorders are all linked.

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Day Treatment vs. IOP – What’s the difference?

Like many other eating disorder facilities, The Emily Program offers multiple levels of care for adolescents and adults. What makes The Emily Program different is that our services are based in outpatient treatment. As The Emily Program founder Dirk Miller says, “We didn’t start as an inpatient program and develop outpatient services to support that model. The reason is pretty simple: most change occurs as an outpatient. We live our lives as ‘outpatients.’ Ultimately we must apply what’s learned to a life of recovery that we live outside the treatment program.”

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Talking About Recovery

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Lately, I’ve wondered what we mean when we talk about recovery. Some people use the term “recovered,” others say “recovery,” and yet others don’t use either. When someone enters into treatment, either that person or their loved ones want to know our success rate. Of course, this presents the question, “Success as measured by what?” As a field, we are at a loss on this question.

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