Posts Tagged ‘Bulimia’

A Recovery Story

Happy woman in the sun

**This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

Heather Coulter is a full-time mother of two who works in her spare time to spread awareness and understanding around eating disorders and disordered eating habits.  Heather has a passion for advocacy and is part of several local grassroots advocacy groups and has served on local NAMI committees. Heather hopes her story will remind those who are struggling that it’s okay to ask for help and that the topic of vulnerability is a strength, not a weakness.   

Hi, my name is ED Hi, my name is Heather and my eating disorder no longer defines me thanks to The Emily Program. It took 26 years, 10 months, and 1 day for me to recognize that my life, body, and soul deserved more and that I matter. On April 14th, 2015 I sat in the Anna Westin House parking lot staring at the doors in fear of the future. I was ashamed, scared, guilty, skeptical, and felt unworthy of the path ahead. The day I walked into that house changed my life forever and for that, I am eternally grateful.

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Physical Effects of Bulimia Nervosa

Bathroom sink with blue

What is Bulimia?

Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by bingeing and purging. People diagnosed with bulimia frequently binge on food, eating thousands of calories in a single episode. Feelings of shame and disgust often accompany these binge eating episodes, leading to purging behaviors such as vomiting, laxative abuse, over-exercising, and/or fasting. This compensatory behavior is a tell-tale sign that an individual is suffering from bulimia. Despite attempts to lose weight by purging, those with bulimia generally maintain a body weight that is normal or slightly above average.

According to the DSM-5, the following criteria must be met for an individual to be diagnosed with bulimia (please note that if all of the following are not met, an individual may still have a serious eating disorder that requires treatment):

  1. Recurrent episodes of binge eating. An episode of binge eating is characterized by both of the following:
    1. Eating, within a two-hour window, an amount of food that is definitely larger than what most people would eat during a similar period of time and under similar circumstances.
    2. Lack of control over eating during the episode (e.g., a feeling that you cannot stop eating or control how much you are eating).
  1. Recurrent inappropriate compensatory behavior to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or other medications, fasting, or excessive exercise.
  2. The binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors both occur, on average, at least once a week for three months.
  3. Self-evaluation is unduly influenced by body shape and weight.
  4. Binging or purging does not occur exclusively during episodes of behavior that would be common in those with anorexia nervosa.

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The Intersection of Eating Disorders and Diabetes

Sugar and blood sugar monitor

What are eating disorders?

Eating disorders are prevalent and often severe mental health illnesses that are categorized by a disturbance in eating behaviors and related changes in thoughts and emotions. There are many types of eating disorders and treatment is available. While serious, eating disorders do not have to be a lifelong illness. Individuals can experience recovery and continue on to live healthy, happy lives.

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To Exercise or Not to Exercise?

Tying running shoes

Obsessive exercise is one of the most common symptoms of an eating disorder. For people across the eating disorder spectrum—anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other eating disorders—obsessive exercise is a very common behavior and may also feel compulsive, or like it has to be done. It can also be a widespread compensatory mechanism for those who feel they have eaten too much.

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A Winding Road to Recovery

Woman on road

This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

by Kristine Irwin, a wife, mother, and advocate for ending sexual violence. She is a full-time recruiter at Pittsburgh Mercy and runs a non-profit called Voices of Hope.

My eating disorder isn’t something that I usually talk about in great detail. I do, however, think it’s important to tell others about the barriers to eating disorder treatment I faced, the complicated healing process I experienced, and how my mom tirelessly worked to make sure I got better.

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Come On, Healthy Lifestyle Magazines—You Can Do Better!

Magazines

**Content warning: This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences in recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptoms. Please use your discretion when reading and speak with your support system as needed.

By Dallas Rising, a former The Emily Program client and woman in recovery

It’s spring and I’m attempting to start seeds indoors for my garden. Vegetables on my mind, I leafed through a food magazine with a feature on eating more veggies. I didn’t get to the feature on vegetables, though, because my page-flipping stopped cold when I saw a photo of a 1980’s Jane Fonda in her signature leotard/leg warmer combo. The caption made a quip about her (totally awesome) leg warmers before citing new research saying it’s harder to be thin than it used to be.

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