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Articles tagged with: Washington

How do I tolerate how terrible it is to have an eating disorder?

September 04, 2014. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • By Mark Warren, chief medical officer of The Emily Program

    In our conversations about eating disorders we sometimes forget to state the obvious, which is that it’s horrible to have an eating disorder. It is always horrible for the person that has it and the pain of the disorder often extends far past the individual to their family, friends and community. Eating disorders affect everything about us. They affect the way we think, the way we feel, our self image, our experience in our bodies, our minds, and who we are in the world. They destroy our health, our hearts, our brains, and ultimately can take our lives. Eating disorders affect our relationships, school, work, and ability to have the lives we want to have. They are illnesses in the truest sense of the word. They disable us and take our health and well being. Part of the awfulness of having these disorders is that they are not well understood or appreciated for how terrible they are and the pain they cause. Layered into all of this is that the treatment for the disorder often causes more pain. Trying to refeed, stop behaviors, change self image, and work on body image can take us to places that are both painful and frightening. Yet there is no other choice. So what do we do? We find strength from each other, find ways to feed ourselves and make our bodies healthy, and find a community that is healing. We need to believe in and seek out the evidence based care that can help us and trustworthy providers, family, and friends who will be there with us. In Marsha Linehan’s writings she talks about the pain of living in hell and how the only way out of hell is to get on our hands and knees and crawl through the fire until we reach the sunshine. So we acknowledge the pain and acknowledge how awful these disorders can be, but also know that if we keep moving forward we can find the light that will give us our lives back and let us escape the disorder.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman, Therapist at The Emily Program - Cleveland (formerly Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders)

    How do I tolerate how terrible it is to have an eating disorder? originated on Clevelend Center for Eating Disorders blog Clevelend Center for Eating Disorders blog in July 2012.

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What Parents and Teens Should Know About Eating Disorder Treatment

August 14, 2014.
  • By Christy Zender, MSW, LICSW, The Emily Program Site Manager, Woodbury & Toogood (Adolescent Outpatient Services, St. Paul)

    Let’s start with a quick analogy.

    Eating disorders and icebergs are more alike than one might think. Picture an iceberg floating in a vast ocean: You can only see the tip of the iceberg and have no idea of what is under the surface of the water. Most people look at an eating disorder the same way, only seeing what is on the outside, above the water. This generally represents the behavioral parts of an eating disorder – weight, size, shape, purging, excessive exercise, and so on – the things that you can see, measure, and quantify.

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What it Means to be a Supporter

June 24, 2014.
  • By Sarah Hrudka, Outreach Specialist at The Emily Program

    I remember the terror and anxiety that ran through my veins prior to confronting my friends about their eating disorder(s), because I was so unsure of how they might react. But I once heard the quote, albeit a bit cheesy perhaps, that “I would rather have a mad friend than a dead friend.” Not that I had enough power as a single human to save their life and well-being per se, but instead holding steadfast to the notion that I had enough of a voice to help, because I would rather say “I tried” instead of “I should’ve.”

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Join us July 21 for a CEU Event in South Sound, WA

June 17, 2014.
  • Attention Lacey, Olympia, South Sound, Washington professionals.

    Please join The Emily Program for a complimentary continuing education event at the Lacey Community Center on July 21, 2014 from 9:00 AM-12:00 PM.

    Dr. Jillian Lampert, Chief Development Officer of The Emily Program and nationally renowned eating disorder expert will present on The Overlap Between Compulsive Overeating, Binge Eating and Obesity.

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Celebrating One Year in Spokane

June 16, 2014.
  • By Krista Kubiak Crotty, C.E.D.S., L.M.F.T., Psy.D. and The Emily Program – Spokane Site Manager

    Staff First DayLast June we excitedly opened the doors to The Emily Program – Spokane. On the first day, we gathered in the entry way of the building and walked into the office together. One team. United by a passion for helping individuals recover from eating disorders. One year ago there were 8 staff, 6 clinical and 2 administrative. Today there are 22. Still united, and more passionate than ever to help individuals find recovery.

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Does Your Teenager Have An Eating Disorder?

May 06, 2014.
  • The Emily Program offers all levels of care for teenagers, from outpatient services to 24/7 residential treatment. Our compassionate staff understand the complexities that come with eating disorders and that no two teenagers are alike. Working with the teenager and their family, we establish a treatment plan that will fit each individual’s needs.

    In this brief, Ask the Expert video by Mpls-St. Paul Magazine, Dr. Jillian Lampert discusses the signs and symptoms to watch for and how to get started.

    We welcome concerned parents and guardians to call us at 1-888-EMILY-77 (364-5977) if you are worried about your teenager. We’ll help answer questions and guide you through how eating disorder treatment can look for your teen.

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Partial Plus Lodging Available in MN & WA

March 25, 2014.
  • The Emily Program is here to help clients struggling with eating disorders, wherever they are from. We provide lodging options in Minnesota and Washington for adult women over 18 who require a higher level of care, but live a long distance from treatment. Partial plus Lodging is also an alternative for women who might feel their current home environment isn't conducive to recovery.

    Watch the video to learn more about our Partial plus Lodging program.

    With personalized treatment programs for all eating disorders, The Emily Program helps bring recovery closer than ever. Contact our lodging manager at 1-888-EMILY77 (364-5977) ext. 2220 for more information or to get started.

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Stay Up To Date With The Emily Program

March 18, 2014.
  • At The Emily Program we’re committed to:

    • providing the best eating disorder treatment to our clients and families,
    • improving and growing the programs and services we offer,
    • staying current within the eating disorders, mental health, and healthcare fields,
    • learning more about and adjusting our research-based practices to fit client needs as well as sharing our lessons and knowledge with other professionals.

    We have an incredible amount of useful and exciting information to share about all of these things.

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Diagnosing an Eating Disorder in an Overweight Teen

October 18, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    The DSM V has brought formal recognition to a significant issue in those with eating disorders that have been previously excluded. The disorder "atypical anorexia" describes an individual who meet the criteria for anorexia, however despite significant weight loss the individual's weight is within or above the normal range. With the current focus on childhood obesity this awareness is particularly important as children and teens who are overweight may be directed to lose weight for their health. While weight loss may be good advice for some, for others who are biologically predisposed to developing an eating disorder weight loss may lead to the psychological and physical manifestations of this illness. A recent article in the Huffington Post summarized an article from the Journal of Pediatrics – It notes that overweight and obese children and teens who are at significant risk of developing an eating disorder may be ignored or overlooked due to our focus on obesity and weight loss. Pediatric eating disorders do not receive the same attention that pediatric obesity receives. It is estimated that at least 6% of children have an eating disorder and that close to half of high school females and a third of high school males engage in disordered eating behaviors including fasting, diet pills, and laxative abuse. As many as one third of children and adolescents with an eating disorder may be of normal or above normal weight and suffer the same medical consequences, psychological pain, obsessions, behaviors, and loss of quality of life that underweight individuals suffer from. Going forward it is crucial for all of us that we do not define anorexia and underweight as the same thing. Body mass index is not always a measure that can be used to determine if an eating disorder is present. Questions related to disordered eating and weight management behaviors should be asked and taken seriously regardless of weight.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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TEP Seattle Expands Treatment Services

October 03, 2013.
  • The Emily Program Seattle has officially taken up residence on the 7th floor -- you can now find us in Suite 700 instead of 650.

    Along with this move we are expanding our outpatient eating disorder treatment options. Here is a sneak peek at some of our new programming:

    • Neptune Lodging is now open! This lodging option is open to adult women who live outside of the Seattle area and participate in our partial hospitalization program. For more information call (888) EMILY77 (364-5977).
    • An adolescent track will be added in our PHP and IOP programs. This will be available to older male and female adolescents.
    • We will begin a separate adolescent IOP and PHP program – as soon as we have enough interest.
    • This fall we'll begin a Compulsive Overeating/Binge Eating IOP.

    If you're interested in learning more about our expanding services or would like to make a referral, contact us at (206) 283-2220.

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Poems

August 20, 2013.
  • Below are some poems we discovered here.

    Beauty's Definition
    by J.M.

    Words do not define beauty.
    People do not define beauty.
    Looks do not define beauty.

    You define beauty.
    In your depth,
    In your speech,
    In your mind.

    You define beauty,
    with your beautiful
    Mind
    and lovely your
    Heart.

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The Need for Evidence Based Care

August 09, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    A recent article by Dr. Russell Marx, The National Eating Disorder Association's chief science officer, discussed evidence based treatment. The article noted Harriet Brown's New York Times piece, which we have discussed in previous blogs, concerning why surprisingly few patients get evidence based care. Dr. Marx discusses the NICE guidelines, which is the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom. What's particularly exciting about this article was that it noted the growing evidence for the efficacy of FBT and general family based interventions for clients with anorexia. The NICE guidelines are of significance specifically in the United Kingdom but are utilized worldwide in understanding evidence basis for eating disorder treatment. In the NICE guidelines Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is noted as a treatment well conducted with clinical studies for binge eating disorder, but is not included as a proven treatment for anorexia or bulimia. These guidelines were last completed in 2011 and will be reviewed again in 2014. It is our hope that recent studies on DBT will show the effectiveness of this treatment for other eating disorder diagnoses.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program