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Find hope. 888-364-5977

Articles tagged with: Recovery

Experiencing Beautiful

August 28, 2014.
  • By Katie Teresi

    Think, for a moment, about who or what is beautiful to you. It could be people, places, things...

    Now here’s a challenge: If you eliminated every beautiful thing you thought of that was based on sight, how many things would be left?

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A Very Important List

August 26, 2014.
  • This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Cami Applequist, a former client in recovery

    I struggled with both an eating disorder and depression for several years of my life. Over the past few years I have been living a life free from both. I am very grateful for every person who stepped in to give me a hand along the way and for every single thing I picked up that helped me realize that this life of happiness is possible.

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The Meaning of a Birthday

August 22, 2014.
  • Happy-Birthday-to-You-ImageThis is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Jamie Forman, a former Emily Program client and woman in recovery

    I don't get excited about my birthday because of the parties and presents (although I can't complain about those in the slightest :)). I get excited because for me, another birthday marks another year of life; another year of strength and passion and commitment to being clean and sober from everything that I fought against for so long.

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It’s Work and It’s Hard and It’s Wonderful

August 04, 2014.
  • By Cami Applequist, a former client in recovery

    Twenty-two years ago I was a 22-year-old high achieving college student who had already studied overseas three times for a total of two and a half years and was fluent in a second language. I worked thirty hours a week and attended college classes full time while maintaining good grades. I managed to keep a large circle of friends well entertained and my nuclear and extended family happy by participating in family events at least ninety percent of the time. I was on the road to a job in marketing and advertising; to a dream life of red suits, nice cars, high pay and what I thought at the time would be happiness.

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A Client Recovery Story: Erin

July 08, 2014.
  • A message from Erin, a former Emily Program client who is in recovery

    I had the opportunity to record my story of hope and healing for The Emily Program recently. My hope is that in hearing my story you will know that there is hope for you, there is hope for your loved one, there is hope for everyone. Recovery is a journey, and it is there for you. I cannot promise that it will always be easy, but I can promise that it will be worth it.

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Connections: A Client’s Story

July 02, 2014.
  • By Michelle, an Emily Program client

    Welcome to my first blog post. My name is Michelle and I’ve been coming to the Emily program for almost 10 years for help in dealing with compulsive overeating, depression and anxiety. When first asked about doing this blog I hesitated. I didn’t think I had anything special to say. But as I thought about it, I realized I have 3 good reasons for doing this:

    1. I have been through a lot but I’m not unique. All of us are dealing with similar things and I think many of you will be able to relate to some of my experiences. Treatment and therapy can be hard, but knowing you are not alone definitely makes it easier. I also promise to try and incorporate some humor –so be on the lookout for it. You may have to look closely…:)
    2. Doing this on a regular basis will help me reflect and think about my own recovery. It’s easy to get bogged down in my latest problems. This will help me think about things differently and from a different perspective.
    3. The Emily Program has literally saved my life and I want to give back. In the last few years there have been a couple of times when the pain got too big, the hope got too small and I just got too tired of fighting. I am still here today because of the connections I have made with counselors & friends at the Emily Program.

    So enjoy the reading each month. Feel free to send in comments or questions and I’ll do my best to respond.

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F.E.A.S.T. Conference, January 31-February 1, 2014- Connecting the Dots:Expanding the Knowledge Base and Extending the Circle of Care to Fight Eating Disorders Parent Recap.

April 09, 2014.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By A CCED Parent

    I am a parent from CCED programming who attended the recent F.E.A.S.T. Caregiver Conference in Dallas, TX. I had such an amazing experience there, I felt the overwhelming need to let other CCED parents know about my trip. The decision to even attend was very difficult for me because of the expenses and travel costs. I was indecisive about spending so much money on travels for me rather than treatment for my daughter. The deciding factor was something our CCED clinician said to me about self-care being vital for the caregiver. Suddenly I was pointing and clicking because this trip was therapy and education for me.

    I attended the conference to support F.E.A.S.T. and A.T.D.T. because they have been helpful organizations for me. I wanted to hear the awesome speaker line-up in person. I wanted to share stories and information with other parents who are experiencing so many of the same struggles. The conference was very much worth attending because it was two solid days of expert clinicians speaking about ED related topics from all over the country. There was a wealth of information, support for parents and an opportunity for me to speak directly with the expert clinicians over breakfast in a relaxed setting. (Very therapeutic) I also was able to spend time talking to a mom and daughter team where the daughter is most recently recovered. This was both a supportive and tearful experience for me since my daughter and I so very much want to be sitting where that mom and daughter are sitting in recovery. I am sure I wasn't the only parent thinking such thoughts.

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Radical Truth

June 14, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    One of the saddest and complicated components of an eating disorder is how it encourages secrets. Behaviors, negative thoughts, feelings of shame, and the pain one carries often happen in secret. By the time someone presents for treatment they are so familiar and so used to keeping secrets that it can be very difficult to tell the truth. Keeping secrets is not a failure, a betrayal, or an attempt by a patient to trick or fool a therapist or loved one. Keeping secrets is part of the illness. In treatment we need to work on revealing secrets, on becoming more honest and finding ways to speak truths, even though those truths may feel that they expose us. They may expose how ill we really are, the sadness we carry, the obsessions of our minds, our fears that we will never recover, or past events that we wish were not true. The pain of holding secrets is too great and holding them only make us sicker and less likely to receive the help we need. Like radical acceptance, treatment requires radical honesty for patients, therapists, and loved ones. Speaking our truths and being honest both in treatment and with oneself is truly a key to recovery.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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Haiku

August 29, 2012.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    This haiku was written by a client at CCED. He shares it in hopes that it will inspire others.

    A better hope

    gentle wind as a peace

    another sunrise

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On Taking Up Space in the World

  • Confident Woman

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Maia Polson, a woman in recovery

    Many people experience physical changes in their bodies during the process of recovery. Your process may require weight restoration in order to get your body from a state of depletion back to health. Or, it may require you to accept your body where it’s at right now, and to let go of your desire to change your body shape and weight.

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In it for the Long Haul

  • By Maia Polson, guest blogger

    Thoughtful woman

    Eating disorders are known for crafting exceptionalist thinking. Everyone else can follow those standards, but I’m different. Or, Everyone else deserves love and affection, just not me. My eating disorder was, well, no exception. But in recovery, I feel that I have confronted and successfully challenged a good portion of that exceptionalism that my illness thrived on. Even when I take strides in recovery that seem to be faster than expected, I always remember that rule of thumb: “Recovery takes an average of 7-10 years.”

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Recovered vs. In Recovery: Either Way, I’m Living Authentically

  • girl in the cold

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Maia Polson, a woman in recovery

    The debate over being “recovered” versus “in recovery” from an eating disorder is one that I have not participated in for quite some time. I reached a point in my own recovery where I felt comfortable with describing myself as recovered. I also decided then that the only person I needed to define that word for was myself. The debate became irrelevant to me, since I believe that every person’s definition should be one that works for him or her, regardless of what other people might think.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program