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Articles tagged with: Recovery

UN-expecting

June 12, 2018.
  • Woman laughing

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Katie Monsewicz, an avid writer and practicing journalist who has been through The Emily Program's residential treatment program. She wants to help others who have struggled with eating disorders - and those who are still struggling - through her writing and as an advocate for eating disorder recovery.

    “Are you pregnant?” one woman asks another.

    The other woman replies, “Why, yes, I am! Thank you so much for asking! I just love talking about this little baby bump and gift of life and….”

    Except that isn’t how that conversation went.

    While at work yesterday, I was leaning over the customer service counter wiping down the table top and one of the cashiers at the grocery store I work at puts her hand on her stomach and whispers, “Are you pregnant?”

    ...

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Compassion is Key to My Recovery

May 30, 2018.
  • Sisters

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Lisa Whalen, a former Emily Program client, has a Ph.D. in postsecondary and adult education, and an M.A. in creative and critical writing. She teaches writing and literature at North Hennepin Community College in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Her essays have been featured in An Introvert in an Extrovert World, WorkingUSA: The Journal of Labor and Society, and MotherShould? Whalen is working on publishing her memoir, Taking the Reins. In the meantime, she is a regular contributor to The Feisty Writer and maintains a blog called Writing Unbridled.

    “Who’s your best friend?” my Emily Program therapist asked.

    I paused mid-story, blinked, and stared at her with what I’m sure was a baffled expression.

    The answer was a no-brainer, but I couldn’t imagine why she’d interrupted me (something she never did) to ask a question that had nothing to do with our current topic: a mistake I’d made at work.

    “My sister, Julie.” I replied. “Why?”

    Her response sparked an insight crucial to my eating disorder recovery: “What would you say to Julie if she’d made your mistake?”

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Worried It's An Eating Disorder?

May 22, 2018. Written by Jillian Lampert, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., L.D., F.A.E.D.
  • Worried

    Peter's story: Excessive exercise, unusual eating habits

    Josey is the parent of Peter. Josey is worried because Peter seems to have become obsessed with what he is eating and has become extremely committed to his martial arts class in a way that seems excessive compared to the class expectations. Peter is running in addition to 5x/week classes and asking Josey to buy special foods for him – low fat, low sugar, low carb, high protein kinds of foods. He doesn’t really eat with the family anymore, but that’s not so unusual because they are all so busy and often not home at the same time to eat together. He’s lost a significant amount of weight, but he was at a higher weight, so Josey isn’t sure if that’s a problem, or not. Peter is talking about wanting to get “six-pack abs” and seems unhappy with his appearance. Josey has even wondered if he might be throwing up after eating and has tried to watch for behaviors that might indicate that, but so far, she isn’t sure. Peter seems withdrawn and down, but irritable and anxious when engaged in conversation about his day. Josey is worried Peter might be developing an eating disorder, but she doesn’t want to overreact. But, as Peter’s mom, she just knows in her bones that something isn’t right.

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Fighting My Eating Disorder

April 19, 2018.
  • Sunrise

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Mitchell S. Moyer, a man in recovery from anorexia

    When you have an eating disorder, the thoughts that swim in your head are dark and relentless. You ask yourself: Will I ever be the same? Will I ever stop thinking about food? How did I get here, and how do I beat this monster? You rise in the morning. But as the day progresses, your energy wanes and those thoughts continue to weigh you down. You feel adrift in frustration, confusion, and self-doubt.

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Words of Encouragement

April 13, 2018.
  •  Support scrabble pieces

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Katie Monsewicz, an avid writer and practicing journalist who has been through The Emily Program's residential treatment program. She wants to help others who have struggled with eating disorders - and those who are still struggling - through her writing and as an advocate for eating disorder recovery.

    I’m an adult now. (Insert image of me shouting from the top of a cliff like in “The Lion King” movie.) Wow. That was tough to get out.

    I just turned 21 last month, marking nine years of the harrowing illness that has taken over much of my life, much of my memory, many of my relationships. An eating disorder is like moss on a rock. Some people think it’s beautiful (which is pretty strange) and most see it as a nuisance, an invasion. But it takes you over and you can’t shake it without any help from an outside force.

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Taking the Reins On My Recovery

April 11, 2018.
  • Lisa on Horse Jumping a Fence

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Lisa Whalen, a former Emily Program client, has a Ph.D. in postsecondary and adult education, and an M.A. in creative and critical writing. She teaches writing and literature at North Hennepin Community College in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Her essays have been featured in An Introvert in an Extrovert World, WorkingUSA: The Journal of Labor and Society, and MotherShould? Whalen is working on publishing her memoir, Taking the Reins. In the meantime, she is a regular contributor to The Feisty Writer and maintains a blog called, Writing Unbridled.

    On April 6, 2018, I stood in a college auditorium and scanned rows filled by my faculty colleagues, students, family, and friends—the people I most admire and want to respect me. Then I said something I never thought I’d utter aloud: “For more than a decade, I battled an eating disorder and depression.” That sentence began my faculty lecture series presentation, where I discussed a memoir I’d written about recovering from the eating disorder with the help of an Emily Program therapist and 12 special horses.

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Writing My Way Out of Anorexia

February 22, 2018.
  • woman writing

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Caroline Morris

    I remember reading the following in Fasting Girls by Joan Brumberg two years ago, while I was researching for my master’s thesis: “Published case reports repeatedly said that girls with anorexia nervosa were ‘sullen,’ ‘sly,’ and ‘peevish,’ implying that they were as parsimonious with their words as with their food.”1

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To Exercise or Not to Exercise?

February 13, 2018. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  •  Lacing up running shoes

    Obsessive exercise is one of the most common symptoms of an eating disorder. For people across the eating disorder spectrum—anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other eating disorders—obsessive exercise is a very common behavior and may also feel compulsive, or like it has to be done. It can also be a widespread compensatory mechanism for those who feel they have eaten too much.

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A Winding Road to Recovery

February 06, 2018.
  • Woman on winding road

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Kristine Irwin, a wife, mother, and advocate for ending sexual violence. She is a full time recruiter at Pittsburgh Mercy and runs a non-profit called Voices of Hope.

    My eating disorder isn't something that I usually talk about in great detail. I do, however, think it’s important to tell others about the barriers to eating disorder treatment I faced, the complicated healing process I experienced, and how my mom tirelessly worked to make sure I got better.

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Talking to My Former Self

January 23, 2018.
  • be yourself

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Nicole, a former Emily Program client

    “Man, if I only knew then what I know now.” How many of us have thought something along those lines admits a moment in our present lives? If we could, most of us would probably be delighted to go back in time and let our past selves in on some newly obtained wisdom.

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Maintaining Recovery

December 19, 2017.
  •  Clasped hands

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Nicole

    Six summers ago, I began a new, terrifying chapter in my life as a then seventeen year-old. I, along with my family, decided to admit me to The Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (now known as The Emily Program). Recovery has been an unspeakably arduous journey, and it will be a voyage I will be on for the rest of my life. Six years later now in November of 2017, I am able to cope with my illness to the point where I am able to manage a mostly productive, healthy and happy life. How does one go from breaking down one night, asking to be admitted, to having a job, going back to college, and having a great relationship with a loving boyfriend and parents?

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Journey to Acceptance

December 05, 2017.
  • Candice Sand

    (Photo credit: Libertee Musyka)

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Candice Sand is a recording artist, songwriter, and eating disorder advocate from Toronto, Canada. She has spoken out about her struggle with symptoms of anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder, classified in the DSM-5 as OSFED (Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder), a commonly diagnosed eating disorder. Recently, Candice released a song inspired by her personal experience of overcoming the eating disorder that she struggled with secretly for most of her life. We caught up with Candice to ask her some questions about her diagnosis and path to recovery.

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ED Q&A: What Aspects of Treatment Helped You the Most?

December 01, 2017.
  • ED QA

    We recently asked people in recovery from an eating disorder to share their thoughts about the illness. We hope these insights from those who have "been there" help if you're seeking answers and understanding. A big thanks to everyone who contributed to this post and to all the supportive friends and family out there.

    These are personal perspectives; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

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Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire

November 02, 2017.
  •  Person working

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Dallas Rising, a former Emily Program client and woman in recovery

    Eating disorders are designed to consume us. It can feel like the only way you can ever find yourself is by listening to what they’re telling you to do and following the instructions to the letter. You start to think your self-worth depends on following the rules, and if you break them you’re worthless.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

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