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Articles tagged with: Eating Disorders

Parity Field Hearing Coming to St. Paul, July 16

June 01, 2012.
  • In 2008, Congress passed the The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equality Act (MHPAEA) which requires health insurance companies to provide the same coverage for the treatment of mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders as is covered for physical health problems – including reasonable co-pays and deductibles. This bill was signed into law by former president George W. Bush. Now, almost four years later, progress on the implementation of the bill has slowed.

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National Lobby Day for the FREED Act

April 13, 2012.
  • The Eating Disorders Coalition (EDC) bi-annual National Lobby Day will be on April 24, 2012 in Washington DC. Twice a year professionals and advocates in the eating disorder field travel to Washington DC to talk with Members of Congress. Their objectives are to increase the awareness of the presence of eating disorders in the United States, bolster funding for research and to change the way people with eating disorders have access care.

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Why Can't I Just Eat?

April 13, 2012. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • By Dr. Mark Warren

    Anyone with an eating disorder has been asked at some point or another "Why don't you just eat?" Most likely if you have an eating disorder you have asked yourself the same question. You might wonder "Why is eating so hard for me when it seems to be so easy for everyone else?" On one level the answer to this is incredibly simple, and on another level incredibly complicated. The simple level is biology. Having an eating disorder means having neurological or neuroanatomical organization of your brain that creates enormous barriers to eating normally. These barriers include visual and sensory distortions, impacts on reward centers and executive organization of the brain, distortions of senses of fullness and hunger, and over evaluation of body size and shape, in addition to other issues that may be present. The combination of all of these things makes eating incredibly hard to do. The complex answer comes from the interaction of all the issues above in addition to the fact that eating itself is an activity that is way more complicated than people give it credit for. Eating is not just about seeing food, grabbing food and putting it in our mouths. Eating is about being aware of what's happening inside our bodies, understanding and appreciating our sensations, knowing what gives us pleasure and how to eat in a balanced way. Add social eating and societal influence and its clear that eating is a complex activity on many levels. So the answer to why can't I just eat is that you have an eating disorder and that in fact is what the disorder is. It's what makes it such a scary, painful, and life threatening disease. Having an eating disorder is confronting the question "Why can't I just do something that ultimately may save my life?" It's also what makes recovery from an eating disorder so rich, full, and rewarding. Because when you are able to "just eat", you are able to embrace life in a way that had never felt possible before.

    Should you have an questions or comments regarding this post please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Walk-In Counseling & Referral Services

March 15, 2012.
  • now-openThe Emily Program's St. Louis Park office now has walk-in hours available to Emily Program clients.

    Our Walk-in and Referral Service is available to all Emily Program clients who have been through the complete intake process, are over age 18, and in urgent need of crisis intervention or support. In other words, when your primary therapist is not available in a timely manner or while you are awaiting a primary therapist (after intake evaluation). This service is currently only available at our St. Louis Park location.

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2012 National Eating Disorder Awareness Week

February 24, 2012.
  • February 27 – March 2, 2012

    Eating disorders are serious, life-threatening illnesses that have psychological, biological, and sociocultural causes. The good news is that prevention and recovery are possible.

    The goal of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is to spread awareness of eating disorders and body image issues while reducing the stigma surrounding them. This year, The Emily Program Foundation has partnered with universities in the Twin Cities and Duluth for a number of FREE events across the state in observance and celebration of eating disorder awareness.

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The Importance of Early and Aggressive Treatment

February 06, 2012. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    A recent study by Dr. Janet Treasure, one of the world's most prominent eating disorder researchers, has demonstrated the significant importance of early and aggressive treatment for anorexia nervosa. In her study, regardless of the treatment mechanism, patients who had been ill for longer than three years had significantly worse outcomes after treatment then those who had been ill for less time. Give the lack of evidence based treatment available until ten years ago, we do not know if current treatment mechanism may be more effective for those who have been ill longer. However, we can certainly say that based on this study, the faster someone gets into treatment and the more aggressive the treatment, clients are faster into recovery and less likely to relapse.

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New Research from the Journal of Adolescent Health

January 06, 2012. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    An interesting article from the Journal of Adolescent Health was recently profiled in the New York Times. This article challenges traditional methodologies for in-patient re-feeding of teenagers with anorexia nervosa. Historically, the protocol for teens hospitalized for anorexia has been to "start low and go slow" with food. However, this often results in much slower weight gain or even lack of weight gain during the first week of hospitalization and may result in a teen being discharged from the hospital at a significantly lower weight than they would have been if they had been re-fed more aggressively. As we know from other literature, not reaching prior growth curves is thought to be the single greatest factor in relapse for anorexia and hospitalization is often utilized to jump start this vital and necessary weight gain.

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Tips for the Holidays

December 09, 2011.
  • The holidays often involve family rituals and traditions where food has a central role, and can be a difficult time of year for those who struggle with their relationship to food and their bodies. The holidays also may be one of the few times that a family comes together each year, and planning ahead can help people with eating disorders and their loved ones manage these challenges and enjoy conversation and good times with friends and family during holiday celebrations.

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Body Image

September 15, 2011.
  • By Kelsey

    It’s hard to believe that a week of school has already come and gone. I love fall and back-to-school. I always feel a bit of excitement when I walk down the aisles of Target at the end of July and see the school supplies. There is something about new folders and notebooks that takes me back to being a kid with endless excitement about school. I miss that innocence.

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We’re The Emily Program

December 15, 2009.
  • The Emily Program is a warm and welcoming place, close to home and work, where individuals and their families can find comprehensive treatment for eating disorders and related issues.

    We offer comprehensive psychological, nutritional, medical and psychiatric care at multiple locations across the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area and Duluth. Treatment options range from periodic outpatient appointments to residential/inpatient care at the Anna Westin House.

    We offer help with a variety of eating disorder, exercise and body image issues, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, compulsive overeating, binge eating disorder and eating disorder not otherwise specified.

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On Taking Up Space in the World

  • Confident Woman

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Maia Polson, a woman in recovery

    Many people experience physical changes in their bodies during the process of recovery. Your process may require weight restoration in order to get your body from a state of depletion back to health. Or, it may require you to accept your body where it’s at right now, and to let go of your desire to change your body shape and weight.

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Recovery App Released for iPhone and Android

  • Jenna Tregarthen is an Australian that is just like one of millions worldwide that has a loved one struggling with an eating disorder. So, as a part of her PhD research, Jenna developed an app that helps individuals in both eating disorder treatment and recovery track their progress on their smart phones.

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In it for the Long Haul

  • By Maia Polson, guest blogger

    Thoughtful woman

    Eating disorders are known for crafting exceptionalist thinking. Everyone else can follow those standards, but I’m different. Or, Everyone else deserves love and affection, just not me. My eating disorder was, well, no exception. But in recovery, I feel that I have confronted and successfully challenged a good portion of that exceptionalism that my illness thrived on. Even when I take strides in recovery that seem to be faster than expected, I always remember that rule of thumb: “Recovery takes an average of 7-10 years.”

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Recovered vs. In Recovery: Either Way, I’m Living Authentically

  • girl in the cold

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Maia Polson, a woman in recovery

    The debate over being “recovered” versus “in recovery” from an eating disorder is one that I have not participated in for quite some time. I reached a point in my own recovery where I felt comfortable with describing myself as recovered. I also decided then that the only person I needed to define that word for was myself. The debate became irrelevant to me, since I believe that every person’s definition should be one that works for him or her, regardless of what other people might think.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program