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Articles tagged with: Cleveland

Clients' Thoughts About Recovery

August 18, 2015.
  • By Dr. Mark Warren and clients at TEP

    Recovery from an eating disorder is the clear goal of treatment, however, the scientific literature on clients' experience of recovery is often defined in different ways. In general, the literature tends to focus on re-feeding, growth curves, medical stability, and resolution of behaviors. At TEP we fully endorse that these are the first steps towards recovery and without them no discussion of recovery can take place. That being said, recovery from an eating disorder can have various meanings for those who suffer from these illnesses. In general, there are psychological, social, and identity issues that also change when someone describes themself as being in recovery. We feel it is important to talk to our clients and their families to gain understanding of what recovery means to them. With this in mind we had a conversation with clients about this issue. We asked them to answer the question "How do i know if I am in recovery?" Please find their responses below:

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What does it mean if a program says they "do Dialectical Behavioral Therapy"?

August 11, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D., Lucene Wisniewski, PhD
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Drs Lucene Wisniewski and Mark Warren

    Over the last 15 years Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) has gone from being virtually unknown to being a term utilized by many treatment programs. DBT is an evidence based therapy, initially designed for Borderline Personality Disorder, and more lately for other diagnoses including eating disorders (Wisniewski, L., Safer, D., & Chen, E.Y., 2007). With its increase in popularity among treatment providers it is important to be clear about what it means to "do DBT" so an individual knows if they're receiving evidence based care.

    Comprehensive DBT treatment, initially described by Marsha Linehan, has four components: Individual therapy, skills group, 7 day week phone consultation availability, and consultation team for therapists known as "therapy for therapists". Unless all four of these components are present, a program is not providing comprehensive DBT treatment. Additionally, in order for a therapist to be capable of providing DBT, a significant training process is generally required. This training process necessitates a therapist taking a non-judgmental stance, the ability to encourage motivation and commitment with their client, extensive knowledge and understanding of the DBT skills and therapeutic techniques, and the balance of accepting where a client is while moving them towards change.

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Eating Disorders Are Not A Teenage Phase

August 04, 2015.
  •  photo of two groups of Teenagers 685x343

    Acknowledging the facts about eating disorders

    In the not so distant past, eating disorders weren't recognized by society - or even some medical professionals - as legitimate diseases. In fact, binge eating disorder wasn't added to the eating disorder portion of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) until 2013, despite being the most common eating disorder in the United States.

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Adolescent and Young Adult Services Available Now

June 17, 2015.
  • photo of Adolescents Teens talking 685x350

    The Emily Program offers a full continuum of eating disorder care tailored specifically for male and female clients ages 10 - early 20s. From outpatient to 24/7 residential treatment, our staff can help young people learn skills to help them lead full, healthy lives. We offer a wide-spectrum of interventions, from Family-Based Treatment (FBT) to Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT skills).

    Our staff ensure that each person is provided the treatment that is best suited for their age and needs. A variety of programs are available at many of our locations.

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Heart Rates and Eating Disorders

April 23, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • photo of an EKG Heartbeat

    By Dr. Mark Warren, chief medical officer at The Emily Program

    One area that is a constant concern with those with eating disorders has to do with heart rate, in particular, low heart rate. This issue is generally observed at low body weight but can happen anytime there has been a significant amount of weight loss. In general, as one loses weight one loses muscle mass. With the loss of muscle mass there may be loss of heart mass as the heart is a muscle.

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Family-Based Therapy (FBT) Family Meals

April 07, 2015. Written by Lucene Wisniewski, PhD
  • WordsWithWisniewski

    By Lucene Wisniewski, chief clinical officer

    "How do Parents of Adolescent Patients with Anorexia Nervosa Interact with their Child at Mealtimes? A study of Parental Strategies used in the Family Meal Session of FBT." International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol 48, issue 1, p. 72-80 White, Haycraft, Madden, Rhodes, Miskovic-Wheatley, Wallis, Kohn & Meyer (2015)

    This recent study examined the types of parental mealtime strategies used during a family meal session of Family-Based Therapy (FBT). Researchers studied 21 families with children between the ages of 12 to 18 who were receiving FBT for anorexia nervosa. They also were interested in the emotional tone of the meal, as well as the parents' ability to get their child to eat.

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Examining emotion regulation in anorexia patients

March 10, 2015. Written by Lucene Wisniewski, PhD
  • WordsWithWisniewski

    Without effective treatment, eating disorders can be chronic and life threatening. Therefore as patients, we should be well-informed consumers of the treatment we receive. In fact, being armed with accurate information about what constitutes best practices in treatment could be the difference between life and death.

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What is the best treatment at any given time when recovering from an eating disorder?

February 10, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • By: Mark Warren, MD, chief medical officer at The Emily Program

    What is the best treatment at any given time when recovering from an eating disorder? This is one of the great questions providers, clients, and families alike struggle to answer.

    We know there are significant scientifically based therapies that deliver positive outcomes, including weight restoration and behavior cessation. In fact, The Emily Program incorporates these therapies in our programs — Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and Family-Based Therapy — and has experienced much success through them.

    Having said that, however, we also know that many clients who are able to cease behaviors and achieve weight restoration may continue to experience physiological distress, urges, body dissatisfaction, and anxiety, among other eating disorder symptoms.

    Further complicating the issue, eating disorders often occur in secret and many clients may not reveal the intensity of their behaviors, thoughts and feelings during treatment.

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Eating Disorder Awareness Month 2015

February 09, 2015.
  • February marks our chance to amplify the work we do throughout the year. We have the unique opportunity to partner with colleges, universities, and other community members who also want to build awareness around eating disorders.

    This month our staff will be working coast-to-coast to discuss eating disorders and their devastating effects on individuals, families, and communities. And to let people know that recovery is possible.

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When Does Exercising Become Unhealthy?

January 06, 2015.
  • By Joanna Hardis, LISW-S at The Emily Program-Cleveland

    Exercise Room

    As we enter a new year, everywhere I turn I’m seeing commercials for home video programs promising body transformations; I’m receiving countless offers for weight-loss and fitness programs; and I cannot open a magazine without being inundated with exercises guaranteeing a better, leaner body.

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Voices Get Heard at This Year’s Cleveland NEDA Walk

November 14, 2014.
  • This year's second annual Cleveland NEDA Walk was a huge success. More than 100 of you joined us on Oct. 18 to raise our voices and funds in the fight against eating disorders. It was the biggest turnout to date!

    We're grateful for NEDA (National Eating Disorders Association) and host Olivia Armand for coordinating this special event. By coming together as a community, we were able to shed light on this devastating illness and support NEDA's prevention, service and treatment programs.

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The Emily Program – Cleveland patient recovers from eating disorder, vows to give back

October 10, 2014.
  • A recent article on Cleveland.com reports on varsity volleyball player Veronica Gehring who was diagnosed with anorexia during her junior season. It began with an obsession to "become faster on the court and a stronger volleyball player," she said.

    But soon she was exercising upwards of four times per day and barely eating anything at all. At times, she'd purge everything if she felt she ate too much.

    After looking to the The Emily Program – Cleveland for help, she was soon hospitalized with a heart rate of 28 beats per minute during the day, falling to 17 beats per minute while sleeping. She was refed in the hospital and later released. The following months were a whirlwind of doctor visits and checkups, but she found herself on the road to recovery.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program