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Articles tagged with: Body Image

The Ballad of a Thin Man with Anorexia

August 14, 2018.
  • Ken Cjpg

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Ken Capobianco is the author of the novel Call Me Anorexic: The Ballad of a Thin Man. He has written about pop music and the arts for over 30 years. He also taught literature and writing at Northeastern University and journalism at Emerson College in Boston. He lives in Long Beach, California with his wife, Ratanan.

    When I shopped my novel about a twenty-something anorexic male to agents, the most common questions I received were, “Did you make this male anorexic aspect up for drama’s sake?” and “Male anorexia is not a thing, is it?” This ignorance or lack of awareness did not surprise me because I’d encountered it throughout my life as a professional journalist and a college professor. You see, I suffered from severe, life-threatening anorexia for 30 years, and if I ever even hinted to people I had anorexia, I always heard, “No you don’t. You’re a guy. Be a man.”

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Tips That Helped Me in Eating Disorder Recovery

July 03, 2018.
  •  blythe baird

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Blythe Baird is a spoken word poet, author, actress, and leo. The re-release of her first book, GIVE ME A GOD I CAN RELATE TO, comes out in 2018. Her work has been featured by Glamour, The Huffington Post, Mic, Write Bloody, Button Poetry, EverydayFeminism, and more. Get in touch with Blythe at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    1. Personifying my body

    Not long ago, a question bubbled to the surface of my brain: if my body could speak, would she forgive me? Though it sounds strange, it was wildly helpful for me to start thinking of my body as a being separated from myself. This mindset made it easier for me to be gentle and more forgiving with my body, because we are sadly often more willing to be unkind to ourselves than we are to someone else. I began to experience newfound guilt for putting my body through the abuse of my eating disorder, because what did my poor, loyal body do to deserve such violence? The answer is nothing, and the same is true for you, too: your sweet body did nothing to deserve to endure the wrath of you.

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Trans Issues, Body Image, and Identity

June 28, 2018.
  •  abstract art artistic 673648

    In a post earlier this month, we discussed the prevalence of body image issues and eating disorders in tne trangender community. Today we're wrapping up our PRIDE month series with an interview that puts a human face to the issue of body image and identity in the trans community.

    TEP: Tell us about yourself!

    Sam: My name is Sam Dylan Finch! My pronouns are he/him. I’m a blogger, editor, and media strategist. And a whole bunch of other things — like a drag queen! — but that’s the gist.

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Gender Non-Conforming Perspective: Body Image and Identity

June 19, 2018.
  • Alok

    Alok (they/them) is a gender non-conforming performance artist, writer, educator and entertainer. They are known for their sense of style, comedy, a poetic challenge to the gender binary. Alok has been featured on HBO, MTV, The Guardian, National Geographic, The New York Times, and that’s just the beginning. They have also presented their work at over 300 venues in more than 30 countries. You can learn more about Alok here.

    Given the lack of diverse voices typically found in discussions of body image, we wanted to interview Alok for our PRIDE month series and ask their opinions on body image and identity as someone who identifies as a South Asian nonbinary person.

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Eating Disorders in the Transgender Community

June 14, 2018.
  • Trans Flag LGBT Singapore Wear Your Voice Article 800x600 2000x2000

    What does transgender mean?

    According to the American Psychological Association, “Transgender is an umbrella term for persons whose gender identity [internal sense of being male, female or another identity] or gender expression [how gender is communicated through behavior, clothing, body and other characteristics] does not conform to that typically associated with the sex to which they were assigned at birth.” Simply put, it is a term used when a person doesn’t identify with the sex they were given. For example, if an individual is born and deemed male by a doctor but knows that they are female and chooses to present as such, that person may refer to themselves as being transgender. It is important to note that not everyone who appears gender-nonconforming will identify as transgender. In addition, being transgender is not related to a person’s sexual preferences.

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UN-expecting

June 12, 2018.
  • Woman laughing

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Katie Monsewicz, an avid writer and practicing journalist who has been through The Emily Program's residential treatment program. She wants to help others who have struggled with eating disorders - and those who are still struggling - through her writing and as an advocate for eating disorder recovery.

    “Are you pregnant?” one woman asks another.

    The other woman replies, “Why, yes, I am! Thank you so much for asking! I just love talking about this little baby bump and gift of life and….”

    Except that isn’t how that conversation went.

    While at work yesterday, I was leaning over the customer service counter wiping down the table top and one of the cashiers at the grocery store I work at puts her hand on her stomach and whispers, “Are you pregnant?”

    ...

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Body Positivity: According to You!

June 06, 2018.
  •  jumping on the beach

    At The Emily Program, we believe that people of all shapes and sizes deserve respect, and that everyone has the right to inhabit a body that is comfortable and healthy for them, regardless of cultural expectations. While we recognize that the body positivity movement has flaws, including an underrepresentation of diverse voices, we firmly believe that we should honor and appreciate how our bodies help us move through the world.

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What is “Summer Seasonal Affective Disorder ”?

June 01, 2018.
  • Woman in the sun

    Summer SAD: A lesser-known condition

    Most of us understand what it’s like to get the winter blues, where the only thing we want to do is cuddle up and watch Netflix for hours on end. However, for some of us, these blues are serious enough to be classified as a condition called Seasonal Affective Disorder, commonly referred to as SAD. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, SAD is a type of depression that’s directly related to the change of seasons and affects people at the same time every year. Symptoms may include: depression, loss of interest, low energy, sleep disturbances, changes in appetite or weight, negative thoughts, and/or thoughts of suicide (if you are having suicidal thoughts or ideations, talk to your therapist or call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-274-8255. Chat is available here for those who are deaf or hard of hearing). While most people think SAD only appears in the winter, summer SAD is surprisingly common and starts in late spring and lasts until early fall. The most common symptoms of summer SAD are insomnia, poor appetite, weight loss, and anxiety (Mayo Clinic, 2017).

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Social Media and Body Image

May 17, 2018.
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    Eating disorders affect approximately 30 million people in the United States and have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. With the majority of that population using social media daily, it’s not hard to see why the use of social media can prompt or exacerbate disordered eating. With celebrities like Kim K. promoting thinspiration to “health” blogs pushing fitspiration, researchers sought to answer the question, “Does constant exposure to body image posts have a positive effect on fitness, nutrition, and making healthy choices?”

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What is Beauty?

May 01, 2018.
  • Mirror and flowers

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Katie Monsewicz is an avid writer and practicing journalist who has been through The Emily Program's residential treatment program. She wants to help others who have struggled with eating disordersand those who are still struggling—through her writing and as an advocate for eating disorder recovery.

    I think a lot of young women these days believe beauty can be bottled. Or fit into little squares of colorful compacted powder. Or melted into a tube of matte wax.

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My Body is Not the Destination

April 20, 2018.
  • cyclists

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Joe Kelly, guest blogger

    Ever heard the notion that the body is the temple of the soul? My church taught that idea when we were young, as a way to encourage us to treat our bodies with respect.

    Our teachers also taught us to treat our church building with respect. That’s no surprise—have you ever heard of a faith community that did not treat its place of worship with respect (whether an ornate temple; massive megachurch; or rickety structure hand-build with found materials)?

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Dear Body

April 20, 2018. August 15, 2018.
  • Writing a letter

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Dear Body,

    It’s time we had a talk. I’m sorry I hurt you in the past. I’m sorry for the negative words, the harsh criticism and hurtful actions. I know you deserve better and I DO/WILL love you exactly as you are. I promise to tell you how beautiful you are to me. To commit to treating you kindly and celebrating all that you do for me. I pledge to view exercise as a source of health and not as a way to fight or control you. When I look at you I will see possibilities and blessings, not problems and shortcomings. I promise to allow you to rest and find balance so that you can reach your full potential. Because I know that, when given the chance, you can do anything. I promise to live by MY standards, not by the standards of society. I am a REAL person not an edited picture in a magazine. And being myself makes me ten times more beautiful than what you see on TV. I realize that the words healthy and skinny do not have the same definition. I promise to stop fat talk and encourage those around me to do the same. I pledge to be a model of confidence and strength for younger generations.

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Fighting My Eating Disorder

April 19, 2018.
  • Sunrise

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Mitchell S. Moyer, a man in recovery from anorexia

    When you have an eating disorder, the thoughts that swim in your head are dark and relentless. You ask yourself: Will I ever be the same? Will I ever stop thinking about food? How did I get here, and how do I beat this monster? You rise in the morning. But as the day progresses, your energy wanes and those thoughts continue to weigh you down. You feel adrift in frustration, confusion, and self-doubt.

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Taking the Reins On My Recovery

April 11, 2018.
  • Lisa on Horse Jumping a Fence

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    Lisa Whalen, a former Emily Program client, has a Ph.D. in postsecondary and adult education, and an M.A. in creative and critical writing. She teaches writing and literature at North Hennepin Community College in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Her essays have been featured in An Introvert in an Extrovert World, WorkingUSA: The Journal of Labor and Society, and MotherShould? Whalen is working on publishing her memoir, Taking the Reins. In the meantime, she is a regular contributor to The Feisty Writer and maintains a blog called, Writing Unbridled.

    On April 6, 2018, I stood in a college auditorium and scanned rows filled by my faculty colleagues, students, family, and friends—the people I most admire and want to respect me. Then I said something I never thought I’d utter aloud: “For more than a decade, I battled an eating disorder and depression.” That sentence began my faculty lecture series presentation, where I discussed a memoir I’d written about recovering from the eating disorder with the help of an Emily Program therapist and 12 special horses.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

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