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Articles tagged with: Anorexia

Worried It's An Eating Disorder?

May 22, 2018. Written by Jillian Lampert, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., L.D., F.A.E.D.
  • Worried

    Peter's story: Excessive exercise, unusual eating habits

    Josey is the parent of Peter. Josey is worried because Peter seems to have become obsessed with what he is eating and has become extremely committed to his martial arts class in a way that seems excessive compared to the class expectations. Peter is running in addition to 5x/week classes and asking Josey to buy special foods for him – low fat, low sugar, low carb, high protein kinds of foods. He doesn’t really eat with the family anymore, but that’s not so unusual because they are all so busy and often not home at the same time to eat together. He’s lost a significant amount of weight, but he was at a higher weight, so Josey isn’t sure if that’s a problem, or not. Peter is talking about wanting to get “six-pack abs” and seems unhappy with his appearance. Josey has even wondered if he might be throwing up after eating and has tried to watch for behaviors that might indicate that, but so far, she isn’t sure. Peter seems withdrawn and down, but irritable and anxious when engaged in conversation about his day. Josey is worried Peter might be developing an eating disorder, but she doesn’t want to overreact. But, as Peter’s mom, she just knows in her bones that something isn’t right.

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Contribute to Anorexia Research

March 13, 2018.
  • research studies uc san diego

    Continued research on eating disorders helps us better understand these complicated illnesses. 

    The University of California San Diego Eating Disorders Center for Treatment and Research will be conducting a study focused on physiological responses to sensation and emotion in participants who have struggled with anorexia nervosa. The researchers hope to determine whether there are learning differences in individuals who have had an eating disorder compared to those who have not. They believe that this research could eventually help with the development of better treatments for eating disorders.

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Writing My Way Out of Anorexia

February 22, 2018.
  • woman writing

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Caroline Morris

    I remember reading the following in Fasting Girls by Joan Brumberg two years ago, while I was researching for my master’s thesis: “Published case reports repeatedly said that girls with anorexia nervosa were ‘sullen,’ ‘sly,’ and ‘peevish,’ implying that they were as parsimonious with their words as with their food.”1

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To Exercise or Not to Exercise?

February 13, 2018. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  •  Lacing up running shoes

    Obsessive exercise is one of the most common symptoms of an eating disorder. For people across the eating disorder spectrum—anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other eating disorders—obsessive exercise is a very common behavior and may also feel compulsive, or like it has to be done. It can also be a widespread compensatory mechanism for those who feel they have eaten too much.

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An impaired ability to decode others’ emotions may affect anorexia outcomes

November 30, 2016.
  • Faces

    Recent research has focused on how impaired social cognition might play a role in the development and persistence of anorexia nervosa (AN). (“Social cognition” refers to the thought processes that underlie social interaction, allowing people to empathize, decode others’ thoughts and emotions, and appropriately shape their own behavior in social situations.)

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When the Lyrics Quieted the Noise

October 26, 2016.
  • Woman listening to music

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Nicole, a former Emily Program client

    As I have grown up and entered the new chapter in my life that has begun my years as a young adult, I have had many obstacles thrown my way before reaching the age of 21. I am happy to say that I am living a happy, healthy, productive, and recovering life in my house up north with my mom and dad. However, it took many years of therapy, medication adjustments, and support from my loved ones to get to where I am today. Things weren’t always promising for me.

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When the World Becomes Your Treatment Center

July 12, 2016.
  • cliffs of moher 981873 1280

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed. 

    Guest blogger Claire Klaisner, 18 years old, was diagnosed with an eating disorder at age 12. Passionate about spreading eating disorder awareness, Claire started a blog (http://www.forevergoingforward.wordpress.com) that chronicles her journey with the disease and regularly post videos on her pro-recovery YouTube channel.

    Treatment—it was something that completely consumed my life after being diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at the age of twelve. After my diagnosis, my life instantly became filled with frightening emergency room visits, traumatizing inpatient admissions, and emotional appointments with therapists, dietitians, and physicians. But despite years of intense nutritional rehabilitation and cognitive therapy, my eating disorder refused to free me from its grasp.  

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Your Recovery is YOURS

June 14, 2016.
  • hiker 918473 1280

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Carla Bellino, a former The Emily Program client and woman in recovery. Carla's own blog can be found here.

    I’ve suffered from anorexia nervosa for a little more than 3 years, paired with depression, anxiety, and self harm struggles. I’ve been through every care level of treatment available at The Emily Program.

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Words with Wisniewski: Research Review -- Focus on Perfectionism in Female Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

December 10, 2015. Written by Lucene Wisniewski, PhD
  • WordsWithWisniewski

    Article: Focus on Perfectionism in Female Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa. International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol 48:7 936-941. Hurst & Zimmer-Gembeck, 2015

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a difficult illness to recover from for a number of reasons. First and foremost, it's life threatening and secondly, the treatments available do not yield high success rates and are in need of improvement.

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New Research from the Journal of Adolescent Health

January 06, 2012. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    An interesting article from the Journal of Adolescent Health was recently profiled in the New York Times. This article challenges traditional methodologies for in-patient re-feeding of teenagers with anorexia nervosa. Historically, the protocol for teens hospitalized for anorexia has been to "start low and go slow" with food. However, this often results in much slower weight gain or even lack of weight gain during the first week of hospitalization and may result in a teen being discharged from the hospital at a significantly lower weight than they would have been if they had been re-fed more aggressively. As we know from other literature, not reaching prior growth curves is thought to be the single greatest factor in relapse for anorexia and hospitalization is often utilized to jump start this vital and necessary weight gain.

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