Get help. Refer a patient. Find hope. 888-364-5977

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Get help. Refer a patient.
Find hope. 888-364-5977

Blog Archives: June 2015

Eating with Our Clients: The Therapeutic Meal

June 25, 2015.
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    By Lisa Diers, Director of Nutrition, The Emily Program

    At The Emily Program, our registered dietitian nutritionists work with clients to help them heal their relationships to food and physical selves. Incorporating the proper mix of nourishment into their daily lives helps their bodies and minds begin to recover and function the way they are naturally meant to.

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Bridging Research and Reality

June 23, 2015.
  • We invite you to help us establish a broader community partnership between the Minnesota Center for Eating Disorders Research and The Emily Program clients, caregivers, and treatment providers. Drs. Scott Crow, Kelly Berg, and Emily Pisetsky will be joining our July Recovery Night and some July Family & Friends Support Groups to introduce a new series of events that will be offered quarterly at The Emily Program.

    The goal of this series is to increase awareness of, and engagement in, eating disorders research as well as to share cutting-edge research findings with clients, caregivers, and treatment providers. Drs. Crow, Berg, and Pisetsky will provide information about the Minnesota Center for Eating Disorders Research and answer questions about their research as well as the field of eating disorder research more broadly. Additionally, attendees will be invited to provide feedback on topics of greatest interest to the community that will guide future meetings.

    The Emily Program clients, family members, friends, treatment providers, and staff are invited and encouraged to participate. We look forward to your input and starting this collaboration!

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Responding to Cultural Pressure

June 18, 2015.
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    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    There is great pressure on women to gracefully and effortlessly do it all—to find the elusive, delicate balance that will keep everything in its place. As a working mother in recovery from an eating disorder, I am very aware of those cultural pressures. It's hard to measure up, and it can feel sometimes like I'm being judged from all directions: a student gives me a scathing evaluation, another mom thinks I plan to wean too soon (or not soon enough), someone in the grocery store glares at me when my baby starts screaming, a visitor to our house remarks that our lawn looks too dry, and so on. Some of those pressures come in the form of explicit messages, some of them come from societal presentations of femininity and motherhood, and some of them come from my own lingering feelings of insecurity.

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Adolescent and Young Adult Services Available Now

June 17, 2015.
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    The Emily Program offers a full continuum of eating disorder care tailored specifically for male and female clients ages 10 - early 20s. From outpatient to 24/7 residential treatment, our staff can help young people learn skills to help them lead full, healthy lives. We offer a wide-spectrum of interventions, from Family-Based Treatment (FBT) to Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT skills).

    Our staff ensure that each person is provided the treatment that is best suited for their age and needs. A variety of programs are available at many of our locations.

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Living Moderation in a City of Extremes, Part 3: Recovery as Reclamation

June 16, 2015.
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    photo credit: Clare Harmon

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Clare Harmon, a former Emily Program client and woman in recovery

    Before I launch into the topic du jour—recovery as reclamation—I'd like to tell you a story about my pre-recovery, pre-treatment life. Once upon a time, I studied music. I mean, I really studied it. Once upon a time, I practiced between five and eight hours a day; subordinated everything to the viola. Once upon a time, I gave myself to music. I worked hard, eked out a meager living playing weddings, subbing with various mid-tier orchestras, and teaching lessons at a small liberal arts college. Once upon a time, I went to music school and subsequently tried to "make it" as a classical violist.

    Two weeks ago, I wrote about a job I applied for (spoiler alert: they didn't hire me) in the Lower Ninth. The same week I interviewed for that job, I was hired by my current employer—a stellar community school on Broad Street—to teach music fundamentals. At the time (and unfoundedly so), I was disappointed. I had it in my head that I would make a clean break from music, that I'd transfer my love of teaching to the language arts, to poetry, literature, the humanities. Music—all music—represented something destructive, a past that exacerbated my eating disorder and nearly killed me. I'm done with you, I thought. I'm on to greener pastures, a sparkling fantasy world where no one ever hurts and fancy unicorns expunge traumas grand and small. I'm leaving music far behind for pursuits clean, unsullied by my untidy young adulthood. I am a musician by economic, rather than ideological, necessity. As a colleague once callously announced, "I only play the viola if I get paid."

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Living Moderation in a City of Extremes, Part 2: Guilt and Negative Self-Talk in the Lower Ninth

June 02, 2015.
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    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Clare Harmon, a former Emily Program client and woman in recovery

    Recently, I interviewed for a teaching job in the Lower Ninth Ward. After a grueling set of questions, an assessment of my tenacity, my ability to weather verbal abuse, and the telling query "are you comfortable crying in public? 'Cause these kids will test you," I exchanged thank you's with the two-person committee. The corridors that led to the exit were thoughtfully adorned with process art, collages, and outlines filled by vibrant crayon. A scrappy Pomeranian licked my heel and at the threshold of the Walgreens-turned-community center, I accepted a "don't call us, we'll call you."

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program