Get help. Refer a patient. Find hope. 888-364-5977


Get help. Refer a patient.
Find hope. 888-364-5977


There’s Help. There’s Hope! The Emily Program is a warm and welcoming place where individuals and their families can find comprehensive treatment for eating disorders and related issues. This blog is a place for us to share the latest happenings at The Emily Program, as well as helpful tidbits from the broader eating disorder community.

We want to hear your story. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and ask how you can become a contributor!

Intensive + Lodging Expands in MN

May 17, 2013.
  • Hillside livingroom smlTheFlats livingroom smlOn May 8th the newest Intensive Plus Lodging option opened near our St. Louis Park, MN office. This lodging option adds space for eight guests to stay while participating in an Intensive Day Program.

    Intensive Plus Lodging offers adult women traveling from long distances a place to stay while participating in our Intensive Day Programs. Individuals are able to enjoy the comforts of home while getting the treatment they need.

    Learn more about our lodging options, or contact our Lodging Manager at (651) 315-3302.

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Spokane Opens June 3

May 17, 2013.
  • front-entrance-219x127Our Spokane location will open on June 3!

    This office will provide an array of eating disorder treatment options, including:  

    • Eating Disorder Assessments
    • Individual Therapy
    • Group Therapy
    • Family-Based Therapy
    • Nutrition Evaluation and Counseling
    • Partial Hospitalization and Intensive Outpatient Programs
    • Psychiatric Services
    • Medical Services

    The Emily Program Spokane office will be located at: 2020 East 29th Avenue, Suite 200, Spokane, WA 99203.

    To refer a client or learn how to schedule an appointment, please contact us at (509) 252-1366.

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Willfulness vs. Willingness

May 10, 2013.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Samantha Mishne, LISW-S, LICDC

    How do you move from a willful place to a willing place? I remind myself willingness is not a thing or a place; it is instead a view on life. Life is happening all around and I can either be willing to accept the change or feedback I receive, or I can be willful and in turn stay miserable, or say "yes, but". I think about this often with the clients I sit with who are asked or sometimes forced to make changes that are often times reinforced by the world we live in. The strength that they exhibit to move to a willing place is inspiring. I say to the young people who participate in family based treatment, your parents are going to reefed you, so you can either stay willful or move to a willing place. The nourishment that food provides often increased people's ability to a move to a willing place along with parents resolve to care for their children.

    When trying to increase willingness the first thing I do is really try and listen to what it is that someone thinks or wants me to do, then I pro and con making the changes vs. staying the same. Ultimately what moves me to a willingness place is being witness to the change my clients make daily and my acceptance that change is constant. Though I say often that I do not like change the older I get the more I am realizing it is constant. You can only push a way for so long before you need to be willing. It is important to note that there are no shades of gray when it comes to willingness. Currently I am pushing away the water stain on my ceiling because I know I have a leak which I need to become willing to have someone come out and fix. Yes this is not as big an issue (no pun intended) as gaining weight, increasing meal plan compliance, not exercising . . .but it is an example of how every day we are faced with a choice to be willing or willful and we must accept the consequences. I will let you know if my ceiling falls in because I have yet to move to a willing place.

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Walk-in Counseling Now Available in St. Paul

May 07, 2013.
  • Walk-in Counseling Now Available in St. PaulOver the past several months, The Emily Program St. Louis Park office has offered walk-in counseling and referral services to our adult clients. We now offer this same service to adult clients at our St. Paul location, 2265 Como Ave.

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The Broad Response to Evidence Based Treatment

April 09, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    Harriet Brown, well known to readers of this blog and to the eating disorder community for her book Brave Girl Eating, recently published an article in the New York Times on why evidence based care is so rarely used in the field of mental health and psychology. Her article is the latest in what has become a very important conversation about the translation of evidence based research into the treatment of mental illness. This topic was also discussed at great length at the recent eating disorder conference in London, organized by Drs Bryan Lask and Rachel Bryant-Waugh. The keynote of this conference, which echos Harriet's article, shows that the number of practitioners in the community using evidence based care is shockingly low.

    Unsurprisingly the response to this article, the presentation in London, and other articles of this nature has been twofold. Many people and clinicians are excited and hopeful that there is effective treatment for historically difficult to treat illnesses. On the other hand, some practitioners are responding by challenging the notion that evidence based care should be the standard of care. The reasons for this vary from the notion that the evidence is weak (possibly, but it is the best we have), to the assumption that the evidence doesn't apply to every practice (unclear why not), to the criticism that the evidence doesn't acknowledge cultural and clinical realities (it does). Many criticisms are based on the anecdotal experience of the provider. One provider referred to the evidence as "weak tea."

    It is very difficult when scientific evidence challenges our own personal experiences and beliefs. However, if you happen to have an eating disorder, or a loved one has an eating disorder, and if you're aware of the last 20 years of eating disorder treatment, you would want to know that since the advent of evidence based care we have started to get better outcomes. If I, or a loved one, had an eating disorder, I would far prefer a glass of weak tea to no tea at all.

    For more information: Looking for Evidence That Therapy Works

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible


The Emily Program