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Find hope. 888-364-5977

Blog Archives: April 2013

The Broad Response to Evidence Based Treatment

April 09, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    Harriet Brown, well known to readers of this blog and to the eating disorder community for her book Brave Girl Eating, recently published an article in the New York Times on why evidence based care is so rarely used in the field of mental health and psychology. Her article is the latest in what has become a very important conversation about the translation of evidence based research into the treatment of mental illness. This topic was also discussed at great length at the recent eating disorder conference in London, organized by Drs Bryan Lask and Rachel Bryant-Waugh. The keynote of this conference, which echos Harriet's article, shows that the number of practitioners in the community using evidence based care is shockingly low.

    Unsurprisingly the response to this article, the presentation in London, and other articles of this nature has been twofold. Many people and clinicians are excited and hopeful that there is effective treatment for historically difficult to treat illnesses. On the other hand, some practitioners are responding by challenging the notion that evidence based care should be the standard of care. The reasons for this vary from the notion that the evidence is weak (possibly, but it is the best we have), to the assumption that the evidence doesn't apply to every practice (unclear why not), to the criticism that the evidence doesn't acknowledge cultural and clinical realities (it does). Many criticisms are based on the anecdotal experience of the provider. One provider referred to the evidence as "weak tea."

    It is very difficult when scientific evidence challenges our own personal experiences and beliefs. However, if you happen to have an eating disorder, or a loved one has an eating disorder, and if you're aware of the last 20 years of eating disorder treatment, you would want to know that since the advent of evidence based care we have started to get better outcomes. If I, or a loved one, had an eating disorder, I would far prefer a glass of weak tea to no tea at all.

    For more information: Looking for Evidence That Therapy Works

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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Community Event: Exploring Eating Disorder & Recovery Addiction

April 02, 2013.
  • Eating Disorder and Addiction RecoveryMark your calendars for June 20th at 7 PM. Cindy Solberg, MA, LPC, LADC is a therapist at The Emily Program. She will discuss the topic: Eating Disorder and Recovery Addiction at The Recovery Church.

    Date: Thursday, June 20
    Time: 7:00 PM
    Location: The Recovery Church, 253 State Street, St. Paul, MN 55107

    Most people are usually very surprised to learn that eating disorders have little to do with food. Especially when one considers that many people who suffer from eating disorders actually have an unhealthy obsession with food. Eating disorders and addiction often come hand in hand as well. This session will provide a basic level of understanding of the multidimensional nature of eating disorder and addiction recovery. It will also discuss how someone might learn to have a non-addictive relationship with food.

    Thank you to The Recovery Church and Minnesota Recovery Connection for hosting this event.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

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The Emily Program