Archive for March, 2019

Staff Spotlight, Dawn Boettcher

Dawn Staff Spotlight large

TEP: Tell us about yourself!

Dawn: Hi!  My name is Dawn Boettcher.  I am the Site Director for the Anna Westin House West residential program—which is a new Emily Program facility located in the Linden Hills neighborhood of Minneapolis, MN.  I have worked in residential care for over 25 years and absolutely love working with people at this level of care.  The Anna Westin House West will be the second residential facility within the Emily Program that I have been part of opening and directing. 

TEP: What is your professional background?

Dawn: My background includes working in corrections, general mental health, and eating disorders.  I have a master’s and a doctorate degree in clinical psychology and I have worked with both adolescents and adults throughout my career. 

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Why Some Clients Need Residential Treatment

Seattle Group Room

Eating disorders occur at different levels of severity, which is why we offer multiple levels of client care, from outpatient to residential. Whenever possible, our goal is to minimize the disruption to a client’s day-to-day life. However, when an eating disorder presents as a crisis, more intensive care becomes necessary so harmful behavior patterns can be interrupted as soon as possible. Some examples of eating disorder related crises include:

  • Medical instability
  • Inability to control one’s own behaviors
  • Extreme changes in BMI to the degree that physical health may be at imminent risk

 In each of these situations, residential care is most often recommended. In residential care, medical safety for at-risk clients can be maintained because of the presence of 24/7 nursing and medical providers. Residential care exists so that clients who are medically unstable or unable to improve in other care levels can avoid hospitalization, which is a far more restrictive experience. Residential care is not forced care and it is not designed to limit freedom. It is designed to provide safety, rapid results, and to prepare clients for long-term recovery.

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Five Inspirational People in Eating Disorder Recovery

People jumping at sunset

**By Khadiga Khan

Khadija Khan is a content writer at edreferral. She is passionate about recovery and learning every aspect of SEO content writing and marketing by covering multiple niches. When Khadija is not writing, she enjoys spending time reading and traveling.

Eating disorders are brain-based biological illnesses that are serious and can be life-threatening. Eating disorders may be challenging to differentiate, as they are not obvious just by looking at someone’s appearance. They were also historically stigmatized and silenced. However, amidst all this, there are still many who come forward and inspire others who are suffering to find recovery.

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I Can’t Stop Binge Eating

Annoyed man on computer

Do you find yourself struggling with binge eating episodes? Are you eating extreme amounts of food and experiencing guilt or shame afterward? Do you find yourself stuck in a cycle of binge eating and yo-yo dieting? If so, you may have binge eating disorder—a real and serious eating disorder.

What is Binge Eating Disorder?

Binge eating disorder starts when individuals repeatedly and uncontrollably consume excessive amounts of food, which may result in obesity. Binge eating may be driven by a need to soothe negative emotions, anxiety, stress, or depression. However, the feeling of comfort that eating may bring does not last long and individuals may experience shame, guilt, and distress following bingeing episodes. These post-binge feelings may lead the sufferer to swing to the other extreme end and engage in restrictive dieting. This cycle of binge eating followed by extreme dieting is a type of “yo-yo dieting” and can become a long-lasting cycle with negative effects.

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What is ARFID?

Leek soup

Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) is characterized by a disturbance in eating or feeding behaviors that results in significant weight loss, nutritional deficiency, or difficulty maintaining a normal day-to-day life. ARFID was previously known as selective eating disorder (SED) but was renamed to more accurately encompass the disorder.

ARFID can affect individuals of any age, race, gender, or any other demographic categorization. ARFID often co-occurs with other mental health diagnoses such as anxiety disorders or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Like any other eating disorder, ARFID is not a choice and is considered to be a severe illness that requires professional treatment. It is also important to note that ARFID does not stem from a lack of access to food and is not related to an individual’s cultural upbringing.

What makes ARFID different from anorexia?

ARFID is often confused with anorexia due to the weight loss associated with the illness and the pattern of restrictive eating. However, those suffering from ARFID do not share the same desire for thinness or body dysmorphic thoughts that those with anorexia experience. To note this difference, someone with ARFID may abstain from eating due to tastes and textures of foods being intolerable as opposed to someone with anorexia who may abstain from eating due to a desire to lose weight and alter their body shape.

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Episode 5: Anna’s Recovery Story

Anna Hashizume

Episode description:

This is the first episode in our new Recovery Series. The Recovery Series aims to share stories of those in eating disorder recovery in hopes of starting conversations, breaking stigmas, and encouraging healing. On this episode, host Claire Holtz sits down with Japanese-American singer-actor Anna Hashizume as she shares her story of healing.

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