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Articles tagged with: Washington

2016 Eating Disorders Awareness Month

February 02, 2016.
  • 2016 ED Awareness Month

    Every February we have the opportunity to partner with other professionals, colleges, universities, businesses, community groups, and associations to spread the word about eating disorders.

    Eating disorder awareness month is full of events that will be held across the country. Check out the following list of events to see what's going on near you.

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Eating Disorders are Tough. Let's End the Stigma.

November 12, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • BirdTracksinSand Isla 2013 685x375

    By Mark Warren, MD

    I have often wondered why there are so many stigmas around eating disorders. People tend to engage in eating disordered behaviors, whether it's bingeing, purging, compulsive exercise or significant food restriction, when they are alone. There is something so profound about this disease that behaviors can only be done in secret.

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The Neuroplasticity of the Brain

October 29, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
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    In the last 10 years, the notion that eating disorders are biologically based illnesses has begun to gain significant traction both inside and outside the eating disorder community.

    Following "The Decade of the Brain" in the '90s and the explosion of research in brain chemistry, anatomy and function, we now better understand how we are susceptible to eating disorders based on a pre-existing neurological status and how our personalities, behaviors and experiences in eating disorders are all linked.

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The Emily Program – Spokane Offers a Wide Array of Eating Disorder Treatment for Adolescents and Adults

October 20, 2015.
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    Our Spokane clinic continues to grow and add services for individuals of all ages and genders who struggle with anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, or related mental health and body image issues.

    At The Emily Program – Spokane, our multidisciplinary approach ensures that individuals receive the level of care and therapeutic and/or medical services that meet their specific needs. From outpatient to partial plus lodging, our therapists, dietitians, and medical staff provide treatment with each client's recovery and needs in mind.

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Day Treatment vs. IOP – What’s the difference?

September 15, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Like many other eating disorder facilities, The Emily Program offers multiple levels of care for adolescents and adults. What makes The Emily Program different is that our services are based in outpatient treatment. As The Emily Program founder Dirk Miller says, "We didn't start as an inpatient program and develop outpatient services to support that model. The reason is pretty simple: most change occurs as an outpatient. We live our lives as 'outpatients.' Ultimately we must apply what's learned to a life of recovery that we live outside the treatment program."

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Talking About Recovery

August 27, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • BirdTracksinSand Isla 2013 685x375

    Lately, I've wondered what we mean when we talk about recovery. Some people use the term "recovered," others say "recovery," and yet others don't use either. When someone enters into treatment, either that person or their loved ones want to know our success rate. Of course, this presents the question, "Success as measured by what?" As a field, we are at a loss on this question.

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What does it mean if a program says they "do Dialectical Behavioral Therapy"?

August 11, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D., Lucene Wisniewski, PhD
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Drs Lucene Wisniewski and Mark Warren

    Over the last 15 years Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) has gone from being virtually unknown to being a term utilized by many treatment programs. DBT is an evidence based therapy, initially designed for Borderline Personality Disorder, and more lately for other diagnoses including eating disorders (Wisniewski, L., Safer, D., & Chen, E.Y., 2007). With its increase in popularity among treatment providers it is important to be clear about what it means to "do DBT" so an individual knows if they're receiving evidence based care.

    Comprehensive DBT treatment, initially described by Marsha Linehan, has four components: Individual therapy, skills group, 7 day week phone consultation availability, and consultation team for therapists known as "therapy for therapists". Unless all four of these components are present, a program is not providing comprehensive DBT treatment. Additionally, in order for a therapist to be capable of providing DBT, a significant training process is generally required. This training process necessitates a therapist taking a non-judgmental stance, the ability to encourage motivation and commitment with their client, extensive knowledge and understanding of the DBT skills and therapeutic techniques, and the balance of accepting where a client is while moving them towards change.

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Complimentary Professional Eating Disorder CEU Events in Minnesota and Washington

August 06, 2015.
  • At The Emily Program, we enjoy sharing our knowledge of eating disorders with other community professionals. Over the coming weeks we will be holding two free CEU events for professionals who'd like to learn more about the treatment of eating disorders.

    More information about the Woodbury, MN and Lacey, WA events is available below. We hope you can join us. RSVP soon. Seating is limited.

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Eating Disorders Are Not A Teenage Phase

August 04, 2015.
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    Acknowledging the facts about eating disorders

    In the not so distant past, eating disorders weren't recognized by society - or even some medical professionals - as legitimate diseases. In fact, binge eating disorder wasn't added to the eating disorder portion of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) until 2013, despite being the most common eating disorder in the United States.

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Recovery Nights at The Emily Program

July 02, 2015.
  • Recovery Blog Image

    At The Emily Program we know recovery is possible, often from personal experience. Due to this, we enjoy hearing former clients, community members, and even our peers talk about their journey to recovery from an eating disorder. Gathering together as a community provides another level of support. It provides a forum that is safe, inspiring, and powerful.

    This month we will hold Recovery Night in St. Paul, MN and Seattle, WA. You can check our website for all dates and locations of future Recovery Nights.

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Adolescent and Young Adult Services Available Now

June 17, 2015.
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    The Emily Program offers a full continuum of eating disorder care tailored specifically for male and female clients ages 10 - early 20s. From outpatient to 24/7 residential treatment, our staff can help young people learn skills to help them lead full, healthy lives. We offer a wide-spectrum of interventions, from Family-Based Treatment (FBT) to Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT skills).

    Our staff ensure that each person is provided the treatment that is best suited for their age and needs. A variety of programs are available at many of our locations.

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Skinny Crazy Small Performance in Seattle, WA

May 14, 2015.
  • This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Sylvie Mae Baldwin

    I remember telling my therapist, "I don't think full eating disorder recovery is actually possible." Now, I wasn't hesitant or unsure that eating disorder treatment was for me – I honestly wanted to get better. I simply couldn't imagine a day free of compulsive thoughts – "don't think about food...you aren't hungry...you just ate...you don't need to eat..."

    But, low and behold, there did come a time, when...after much hard work...I stopped having disordered thoughts. I no longer restricted my eating; when I felt hungry I ate a snack or prepared a meal. My shopping cart grew to include nut butters and full fat yogurts. I was able to sleep through the night and I dreamt of exotic vacations rather than all the foods I was denying myself.

    These changes came about so subtly, so naturally, that I didn't notice them. In fact, it took me writing a play about my experience with anorexia to realize that "that girl with an eating disorder" that isn't me anymore.
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Join us for a Complimentary CE Event in June

May 05, 2015.
  • Throughout June we will be hosting Eating Disorders and the Brain. This is a free CE event for professionals who want to learn more about eating disorders and/or how to address eating disorders in your work with patients.

    Eating Disorders and the Brain Overview

    Eating disorders are serious, life-threatening conditions that require appropriate care and management by a team of mental health and medical professionals. This session will provide an understanding of the multidimensional nature of eating disorder development and maintenance, challenges related to recovery, and communication techniques to help approach someone who may be struggling. The session will also address the diverse range of people that eating disorders impact and how personalized treatment is effective in managing individual needs.

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Heart Rates and Eating Disorders

April 23, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • photo of an EKG Heartbeat

    By Dr. Mark Warren, chief medical officer at The Emily Program

    One area that is a constant concern with those with eating disorders has to do with heart rate, in particular, low heart rate. This issue is generally observed at low body weight but can happen anytime there has been a significant amount of weight loss. In general, as one loses weight one loses muscle mass. With the loss of muscle mass there may be loss of heart mass as the heart is a muscle.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program