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Articles tagged with: Research

Athletes and Eating Disorders

September 03, 2015.
  • Athletes EatingDisorders Blog685x350

    Female and Male Athletes are Susceptible to Disordered Eating

    While sports and exercise are excellent ways to improve mental and physical health, grow self-esteem, and build relationships, the fact that athletes carry risk factors for disordered eating is one that shouldn't be ignored. What makes athletes vulnerable to eating disorders? What should coaches, trainers, parents, and peers look out for?

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Eating Disorders Are Not A Teenage Phase

August 04, 2015.
  •  photo of two groups of Teenagers 685x343

    Acknowledging the facts about eating disorders

    In the not so distant past, eating disorders weren't recognized by society - or even some medical professionals - as legitimate diseases. In fact, binge eating disorder wasn't added to the eating disorder portion of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) until 2013, despite being the most common eating disorder in the United States.

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Bridging Research and Reality

June 23, 2015.
  • We invite you to help us establish a broader community partnership between the Minnesota Center for Eating Disorders Research and The Emily Program clients, caregivers, and treatment providers. Drs. Scott Crow, Kelly Berg, and Emily Pisetsky will be joining our July Recovery Night and some July Family & Friends Support Groups to introduce a new series of events that will be offered quarterly at The Emily Program.

    The goal of this series is to increase awareness of, and engagement in, eating disorders research as well as to share cutting-edge research findings with clients, caregivers, and treatment providers. Drs. Crow, Berg, and Pisetsky will provide information about the Minnesota Center for Eating Disorders Research and answer questions about their research as well as the field of eating disorder research more broadly. Additionally, attendees will be invited to provide feedback on topics of greatest interest to the community that will guide future meetings.

    The Emily Program clients, family members, friends, treatment providers, and staff are invited and encouraged to participate. We look forward to your input and starting this collaboration!

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Family-Based Therapy (FBT) Family Meals

April 07, 2015. Written by Lucene Wisniewski, PhD
  • WordsWithWisniewski

    By Lucene Wisniewski, chief clinical officer

    "How do Parents of Adolescent Patients with Anorexia Nervosa Interact with their Child at Mealtimes? A study of Parental Strategies used in the Family Meal Session of FBT." International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol 48, issue 1, p. 72-80 White, Haycraft, Madden, Rhodes, Miskovic-Wheatley, Wallis, Kohn & Meyer (2015)

    This recent study examined the types of parental mealtime strategies used during a family meal session of Family-Based Therapy (FBT). Researchers studied 21 families with children between the ages of 12 to 18 who were receiving FBT for anorexia nervosa. They also were interested in the emotional tone of the meal, as well as the parents' ability to get their child to eat.

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How eating disorders affect the neurobiology of the brain

March 23, 2015.
  • photo of a brain

    Our physical and mental health, relationships, and day-to-day life are all affected and challenged by disordered eating habits' pervasive nature. When someone suffers from an eating disorder, the risk of health consequences, such as brain damage, could occur. Disrupted eating behaviors negatively affect adequate nutrition absorption; thus, the brain does not get the nutrients it needs to function properly. This is especially concerning in adolescents, as brain development occurs through early adulthood - meaning that significant periods of growth could be disrupted.

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Examining emotion regulation in anorexia patients

March 10, 2015. Written by Lucene Wisniewski, PhD
  • WordsWithWisniewski

    Without effective treatment, eating disorders can be chronic and life threatening. Therefore as patients, we should be well-informed consumers of the treatment we receive. In fact, being armed with accurate information about what constitutes best practices in treatment could be the difference between life and death.

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Purging Disorder: The Basics

October 02, 2014.
  • The following post was written by K. Jean Forney, M.S., a Doctoral Candidate in Clinical Psychology at Florida State University. Her interest lies in research for purging disorder. You can read more about her and her research here.

    Within the realm of eating disorders there are so many varying factors and potential risks for those who struggle. Research-based treatment can help people get better and live full, healthy lives. In addition, it’s important for us, as a general population, to understand that eating disorders, no matter the exact diagnosis, are incredibly dangerous. They are not a choice and they affect over 14 million people in the United States.

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Participants Needed for New Research Study

July 11, 2014.
  • Participants needed for a study aimed at understanding early eating disorder symptom development!

    The University of Minnesota and The Emily Program are seeking adolescents who have received an eating disorder diagnosis and parents of adolescents with a current or past eating disorder diagnosis to participate in a study looking at eating disorder symptom development. All participants will be asked to come in for a 45 minute session in which they will be interviewed and surveyed about their eating disorder development.

    Participants will be adolescents between the ages of 12-18 with a recent eating disorder onset (i.e., within the past two years) and/or parents of adolescents with a recent eating disorder diagnosis.

    Participants will each be compensated with a $25 Visa gift card for their participation. In person interviews are preferable, we can also complete sessions via phone.

    If you are interested and would like more information, please call us at 651-645-5323 ext 1924 or email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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A Review of Eating Disorders and The Brain

February 26, 2014.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    One of the most exciting books to recently be published on eating disorders is the book Eating Disorders and the Brain by Drs Bryan Lask and Ian Frampton. A review of the book was recently published by Dr. Joel Yager, a prominent psychiatrist in the eating disorder field. Dr. Yager describes 2 parts of the book which I thought to be extraordinarily important. The first is an early chapter in the book by David Wood on why clinicians should love and appreciate neuroscience. This discussion, which focuses on free will, determinism, how the presentation of an eating disorder makes one think about philosophical, clinical, and medical issues is critically important. This chapter also discusses past assumptions and questions around the origins of eating disorders including genes, attachment theory, cultural theories, social adversity, family issues, maturation, issues of neural networks and how all of these issues can be seen not as etiologic factors but as factors that must be considered while treating these complex disorders. By moving beyond etiology into understanding complexity, he makes a tremendous contribution to the conceptualization of these illnesses.

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Diagnosing an Eating Disorder in an Overweight Teen

October 18, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    The DSM V has brought formal recognition to a significant issue in those with eating disorders that have been previously excluded. The disorder "atypical anorexia" describes an individual who meet the criteria for anorexia, however despite significant weight loss the individual's weight is within or above the normal range. With the current focus on childhood obesity this awareness is particularly important as children and teens who are overweight may be directed to lose weight for their health. While weight loss may be good advice for some, for others who are biologically predisposed to developing an eating disorder weight loss may lead to the psychological and physical manifestations of this illness. A recent article in the Huffington Post summarized an article from the Journal of Pediatrics – It notes that overweight and obese children and teens who are at significant risk of developing an eating disorder may be ignored or overlooked due to our focus on obesity and weight loss. Pediatric eating disorders do not receive the same attention that pediatric obesity receives. It is estimated that at least 6% of children have an eating disorder and that close to half of high school females and a third of high school males engage in disordered eating behaviors including fasting, diet pills, and laxative abuse. As many as one third of children and adolescents with an eating disorder may be of normal or above normal weight and suffer the same medical consequences, psychological pain, obsessions, behaviors, and loss of quality of life that underweight individuals suffer from. Going forward it is crucial for all of us that we do not define anorexia and underweight as the same thing. Body mass index is not always a measure that can be used to determine if an eating disorder is present. Questions related to disordered eating and weight management behaviors should be asked and taken seriously regardless of weight.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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The Need for Evidence Based Care

August 09, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    A recent article by Dr. Russell Marx, The National Eating Disorder Association's chief science officer, discussed evidence based treatment. The article noted Harriet Brown's New York Times piece, which we have discussed in previous blogs, concerning why surprisingly few patients get evidence based care. Dr. Marx discusses the NICE guidelines, which is the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom. What's particularly exciting about this article was that it noted the growing evidence for the efficacy of FBT and general family based interventions for clients with anorexia. The NICE guidelines are of significance specifically in the United Kingdom but are utilized worldwide in understanding evidence basis for eating disorder treatment. In the NICE guidelines Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is noted as a treatment well conducted with clinical studies for binge eating disorder, but is not included as a proven treatment for anorexia or bulimia. These guidelines were last completed in 2011 and will be reviewed again in 2014. It is our hope that recent studies on DBT will show the effectiveness of this treatment for other eating disorder diagnoses.

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Parent Conversations and Adolescent Disordered Eating Behaviors

July 26, 2013. Read more

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

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