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Find hope. 888-364-5977

Articles tagged with: Recovery

F.E.A.S.T. Conference, January 31-February 1, 2014- Connecting the Dots:Expanding the Knowledge Base and Extending the Circle of Care to Fight Eating Disorders Parent Recap.

April 09, 2014.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By A CCED Parent

    I am a parent from CCED programming who attended the recent F.E.A.S.T. Caregiver Conference in Dallas, TX. I had such an amazing experience there, I felt the overwhelming need to let other CCED parents know about my trip. The decision to even attend was very difficult for me because of the expenses and travel costs. I was indecisive about spending so much money on travels for me rather than treatment for my daughter. The deciding factor was something our CCED clinician said to me about self-care being vital for the caregiver. Suddenly I was pointing and clicking because this trip was therapy and education for me.

    I attended the conference to support F.E.A.S.T. and A.T.D.T. because they have been helpful organizations for me. I wanted to hear the awesome speaker line-up in person. I wanted to share stories and information with other parents who are experiencing so many of the same struggles. The conference was very much worth attending because it was two solid days of expert clinicians speaking about ED related topics from all over the country. There was a wealth of information, support for parents and an opportunity for me to speak directly with the expert clinicians over breakfast in a relaxed setting. (Very therapeutic) I also was able to spend time talking to a mom and daughter team where the daughter is most recently recovered. This was both a supportive and tearful experience for me since my daughter and I so very much want to be sitting where that mom and daughter are sitting in recovery. I am sure I wasn't the only parent thinking such thoughts.

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Radical Truth

June 14, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    One of the saddest and complicated components of an eating disorder is how it encourages secrets. Behaviors, negative thoughts, feelings of shame, and the pain one carries often happen in secret. By the time someone presents for treatment they are so familiar and so used to keeping secrets that it can be very difficult to tell the truth. Keeping secrets is not a failure, a betrayal, or an attempt by a patient to trick or fool a therapist or loved one. Keeping secrets is part of the illness. In treatment we need to work on revealing secrets, on becoming more honest and finding ways to speak truths, even though those truths may feel that they expose us. They may expose how ill we really are, the sadness we carry, the obsessions of our minds, our fears that we will never recover, or past events that we wish were not true. The pain of holding secrets is too great and holding them only make us sicker and less likely to receive the help we need. Like radical acceptance, treatment requires radical honesty for patients, therapists, and loved ones. Speaking our truths and being honest both in treatment and with oneself is truly a key to recovery.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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Haiku

August 29, 2012.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    This haiku was written by a client at CCED. He shares it in hopes that it will inspire others.

    A better hope

    gentle wind as a peace

    another sunrise

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From Recovery to Liberation

March 30, 2012.
  • Jenni SchaeferJoin us in Seattle on April 26th for an evening with Jenni Schaefer, author of "goodbye ed, hello me.”

    Jenni is an internationally recognized author, speaker, and singer/songwriter, whose work has helped change the face of recovery from eating disorders. She is a consultant with Center for Change and a member of the Ambassador Council of the National Eating Disorders Association. Her work has also been featured in Cosmopolitan, the Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, and Woman’s World.

    Jenni Schaefer: “From Recovery to Liberation”
    When: Thursday, April 26th
    Time: Doors Open 6:00 PM; Event Begins 6:30 PM
    Where: Seattle Pacific University
    Upper Gwinn Commons Area
    3310 Sixth Avenue W
    Seattle, WA 98119

    This event is FREE and open to the public, a book signing is scheduled to follow the event.

    Jenni Schaefer: “From Recovery to Liberation” is sponsored by Center for Change and The Emily Program.

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On Taking Up Space in the World

August 19, 2011.
  • By Maia Polson

    Many people experience physical changes in their bodies during the process of recovery. Your process may require weight restoration in order to get your body from a state of depletion back to health. Or, it may require you to accept your body where it’s at right now, and to let go of your desire to change your body shape and weight.

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Recovered vs. In Recovery: Either Way, I’m Living Authentically

May 05, 2011.
  • By Maia Polson

    The debate over being “recovered” versus “in recovery” from an eating disorder is one that I have not participated in for quite some time. A year ago, I reached a point in my own recovery where I felt comfortable with describing myself as recovered. I also decided then that the only person I needed to define that word for was myself. The debate became irrelevant to me, since I believe that every person’s definition should be one that works for him or her, regardless of what other people might think.

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In it for the Long Haul

January 07, 2011.
  • By Maia Polson

    Eating disorders are known for crafting exceptionalist thinking. Everyone else can follow those standards, but I’m different. Or, Everyone else deserves love and affection, just not me. My eating disorder was, well, no exception. But in recovery, I feel that I have confronted and successfully challenged a good portion of that exceptionalism that my illness thrived on. Even when I take strides in recovery that seem to be faster than expected, I always remember that rule of thumb: “Recovery takes an average of 7-10 years.”

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program