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Find hope. 888-364-5977

Articles tagged with: Recovery

I Love My Body. Seriously.

April 28, 2016.
  • Love myself

    by Maia Polson

    To those of us with eating disorders, the concept of loving our bodies is completely foreign. We all engage in some form of over and under-eating, abusive self-talk, and a denial of our body's real needs. These behaviors seem so habitual that it's hard to imagine doing it any other way, let alone practicing love. I personally assumed that recovery could get my body healthy, but would still feel miserable about it. I knew the crazy body-love that all these recovered people talked about wasn't for me.

    Yet here I am today, able to say that I honestly love my body. I love it every day, all the time. Allow me to explain...

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Recovery Nights at The Emily Program

April 06, 2016.
  • Recovery Blog Image

    At The Emily Program we know recovery is possible, often from personal experience. We enjoy hearing former clients, community members, and even our peers talk about their journey to recovery from an eating disorder. Gathering together as a community provides another level of support. It provides a forum that is safe, inspiring, and powerful.

    This month we will hold Recovery Night in St. Paul, MN and Seattle, WA. You can check our website for all dates and locations of future Recovery Nights.

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Cleveland Recovery Night is March 2

February 29, 2016.
  • photo Join Us for Recovery Night in Cleveland OH

    Recovery is possible and it happens in multiple ways. Come see for yourself.

    The Emily Program – Cleveland is hosting a Recovery Night on March 2 at 6 p.m. at our Beachwood location. It's a free event to offer hope to those struggling with eating disorders. Come out to hear speakers share their stories of success on their road to recovery from eating disorders.

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#ExplainingED: What I want you to know about eating disorders is ..., Part 3

February 26, 2016.
  • Today we share part 3 of our #ExplainingED campaign. Over the past month we have been gathering submissions from providers who help individuals and families recover, the clients who are currently or have previously dealt with ED, and the families and friends who are impacted and supporting their loved one for our #ExplainingED campaign. For these submissions, providers, clients, family, and friends, were asked to complete the sentence "What I want you to know about eating disorders is______________." Our #ExplainingED campaign sheds light on some of the dos, don'ts, insights, hurt, shame, resilience, recovery, and other factors that come with an eating disorder. How would you complete the sentence?

    Make sure to check out part 1 and part 2 of #ExplainingED.

    These are personal perspectives; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    ExplainingED Image3

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#ExplainingED: What I want you to know about eating disorders is ..., Part 2

February 24, 2016.
  • Today we share part 2 of our #ExplainingED campaign. Over the past month we have been gathering submissions from providers who help individuals and families recover, the clients who are currently or have previously dealt with ED, and the families and friends who are impacted and supporting their loved one for our #ExplainingED campaign. For these submissions, providers, clients, family, and friends, were asked to complete the sentence "What I want you to know about eating disorders is______________." Our #ExplainingED campaign sheds light on some of the dos, don'ts, insights, hurt, shame, resilience, recovery, and other factors that come with an eating disorder. How would you complete the sentence?

    Make sure to check out part 1 of #ExplainingED. Join us for part 3 on Friday.

    These are personal perspectives; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    What we see in the mirror is not reality image

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#ExplainingED: What I want you to know about eating disorders is ..., Part 1

February 22, 2016.
  • picture of brain with ExplainingED details

    This week is Eating Disorders Awareness Week. Over the past month we have been gathering submissions from providers who help individuals and families recover, the clients who are currently or have previously dealt with ED, and the families and friends who are impacted and supporting their loved one for our #ExplainingED campaign. For these submissions, providers, clients, family, and friends, were asked to complete the sentence, "What I want you to know about eating disorders is______________." Our #ExplainingED campaign sheds light on some of the dos, don'ts, insights, hurt, shame, resilience, recovery, and other factors that come with an eating disorder. Make sure to check out part 2 of #ExplainingED to come on Wednesday, and part 3 on Friday.

    These are personal perspectives; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

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Taking Up Space

February 16, 2016.
  • image of rocks in stacks and inside a circle 685x375

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    When I was hired for my current job, I was elated. But a little voice in my head tried to justify this success by telling me that the hiring committee must have not have had any other applicants to interview. They probably chose me begrudgingly, it said, and only because the position needed to be quickly filled before the next quarter began. When I received a notification that a magazine wanted to publish one of my essays, I was thrilled, but that voice in my head told me that they had probably made a mistake and sent the acceptance to the wrong email address. When a friend congratulated me about the publication, the voice told me that she was just doing her duty as a friend and that she probably thought it was a mistake, too.

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Buying Jeans for a New Body

December 17, 2015.
  • photo of jeans

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    A few months after I gave birth to my son, I decided I wanted a pair of jeans. None of my clothes from before pregnancy fit, and I was tired of wearing maternity pants. But I was terrified of the process of finding jeans that fit. My body had changed and was still changing, and I had no idea what size to try.

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Our First Recovery Night in Cleveland is December 2

November 19, 2015.
  • Cleveland OH The Emily Program Recovery Night banner

    Recovery is possible and it happens in multiple ways. Come see for yourself.

    The Emily Program – Cleveland is hosting its first Recovery Night on Dec. 2 at 6 p.m. at our Beachwood location. It's a free event to offer hope to those struggling with eating disorders. Come out to hear speakers share their stories of success on their road to recovery from eating disorders.

Read more

Learning to Love Thanksgiving

November 17, 2015.
  •  photo of Autumn Foliage 685x350

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    My partner and I met in the fall, and, on one of our first dates, he mentioned that he was looking forward to Thanksgiving. He said that his family all gathered together, shared a meal, and people talked and laughed and played games. He spoke with such warmth and genuine appeal; it occurred to me that some people actually enjoy Thanksgiving. I, of course, dreaded it.

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You Are Enough.

November 03, 2015.
  • You Are Enough Elizabeth Capper Image

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Elizabeth Capper, intern at The Emily Program

    Several nights a week, I find myself lying wide-awake at 4 a.m. struggling to persuade myself back to sleep. Perhaps what really is on my mind during these sleepless nights is everyone's biggest nightmare: our insecurities.

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Talking About Bodies

October 15, 2015.
  • QuoteBubbles

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    Occasionally, a coworker or an acquaintance will tell me about her new weight-loss diet, or she'll make some kind of self-deprecating joke about how she shouldn't have that second cookie. At work, at the store, at the park with other moms, it happens all the time. It's so ordinary that it seems mundane, expected—especially among women (though I do hear it from men, too). Sometimes it feels like I'm expected to reassure the person who is making the negative comment about their body by directing the attention to my own body, in order to share the feeling of self-disapproval. I used to do this fluently. Without missing a beat, I would reassure the woman who was joking about her body or detailing her new diet, and then I would point at myself, as if to say, "You see? I feel bad about my body, too. You're not alone. We're doing what we're supposed to do."

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program