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Find hope. 888-364-5977

Articles tagged with: Eating Disorders

Breaking Free

July 20, 2017.
  • Freedom

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Sara Stein, a former Emily Program client. Sara is a therapist and musician from Cleveland, OH.

    How It Began

    The word “diet” had infiltrated my being at a pre-teen age. For whatever reason, THIS was my Achilles heel in life – this was the thing that was going to reel me in again and again and unfurl all sorts of chaos, havoc and heartache.

    To keep it short and simple, I spent years and decades trying to manage and control my food intake and construct my body to look and be a certain way. There was always this gnawing, annoying thing in the back of my head telling me I wasn’t enough, that I ate the wrong thing, that something bad was going to happen, and that I needed to work harder and do better.

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When Does a Client Need a Higher Level of Care?

July 19, 2017.
  •  Determining Levels of Care

    At The Emily Program, we personalize each client’s care so they receive evidence-based treatment that matches the severity of their illness.

    Determining the correct level of care ensures that our clients receive the most effective therapies for sustained recovery. Appropriate levels of care also decrease long-term health care costs associated with expensive but ineffective hospital stays that don’t address the core symptoms of eating disorders.

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Secrets

July 13, 2017.
  • Newspaper

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    by Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    A few years ago, when my second album was about to come out, a local alt weekly wrote an article about me. Without my consent, the journalist included information in the article about my struggles with an eating disorder and drug and alcohol abuse. She included specific details that she found on a recovery blog I used to keep. The story she wrote had a narrative arc that was about a queer girl who hit rock bottom, overcame bulimia and addiction, and then turned it all into music. It didn’t paint me in a negative light, exactly, and she did also write nice things about my music, but the inclusion of my struggles from the past in someone else’s words, without warning, shocked me. It was worded in such a way that it sounded like I had shared that information with her in an interview, but I had not. I had not disclosed any information about my history of bulimia or addiction with her, and I struggled to understand why she had included it.

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ADHD and Eating Disorders

July 11, 2017.
  •  Fidget Spinner

    Research has demonstrated that ADHD shares many common symptoms with bingeing/purging eating disorders, such as impulsivity, hyperactivity, and attention deficit. While research detailing the relationship between ADHD and eating disorders is scarce, previous studies have indicated that children with ADHD are more likely to exhibit abnormal eating behaviors than children without ADHD, and that individuals with ADHD are three times more likely to develop an eating disorder than individuals without ADHD. Therefore, a diagnosis of ADHD is a crucial component to consider in eating disorder treatment, as many of the symptoms that accompany this attention deficit disorder may exacerbate or prompt disordered eating.

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ED Q&A: What Do You Wish People Understood?

July 05, 2017.
  • ED QA

    We recently asked people in recovery from an eating disorder to share their thoughts about the illness. We hope these insights from those who have "been there" help you if you're seeking answers and understanding. A big thanks to everyone who contributed to this post.

    These are personal perspectives; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

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Making Plans

June 30, 2017.
  • Calendar

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Carla Bellino, a former The Emily Program client and woman in recovery.

    I am now 23 years old. I’m graduating in December from Baldwin Wallace University with my bachelor’s degree in psychology. But what if I told you that I don’t really have concrete plans after I graduate? I certainly have an end goal in mind, and I know what I want my career to be. But I’m not entirely sure what the road looks like to get there. The thing is, I stopped making concrete plans a while ago because I’ve learned that they rarely work out the way you think they will.

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Goodbye, Self-Acceptance. Hello, Integration.

June 22, 2017.
  • Lighted flower

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Dallas Rising, a former The Emily Program client and woman in recovery

    I sat cross-legged on my yoga mat, doing my best to explain yoga’s role in my life. Inevitably, thoughts of my eating disorder surfaced. I talked about my relationship with exercise, my unhealthy compulsivity with high-intensity activity and severe food restriction. My eating disorder treats numbers as fodder for obsession, so health clubs and gyms aren’t safe for me. Our culture recently recognized the self-punishment associated with “thinspiration,” and instead embraced “fitspiration.” Fewer people recognize the danger of fitspiration, although it encourages an equally destructive and punishing mindset. It celebrates those that ignore physical distress in the name of fitness. Both paradigms frame the body as something to conquer, shape, and control.

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How One College Student Took Over Washington (Not Really)

June 15, 2017.
  • Liza Lobby Day

    by Liza Miller, a college student studying psychology with an emphasis on Gender and Women's Studies.

    "Wait so all of these people are in The Red Sea?"
    "No, no. It's called the REDC. The Residential Eating Disorders Consortium."

    This was the first interaction I had at Lobby Day this year. Considering I was the one asking this question, I was not off to a great start.

    To give you some background: I am a twenty-year-old college student studying psychology. So when my dad [Dirk Miller, Executive Chairman and Founder of The Emily Program] invited me to join him in petitioning representatives of members of Congress about eating disorder-related legislation, I felt both thrilled and wildly underprepared.

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Join Us for a Continuing Education Event in Northern California

June 14, 2017.
  • Continuing education opportunities

    We have an exciting opportunity to share with healthcare professionals in Northern California. We are offering two continuing education presentations discussing the latest research in neurobiology and techniques that can support your treatment of clients struggling with eating disorders. The complimentary events (worth two CEUs) will take place June 26th in Berkeley and June 27th in Sacramento.

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Is It Harder to Self-Identify Disordered Eating?

June 08, 2017.
  • Selfie cropped

    Many previous studies have attempted to decipher how women perceive the disordered eating behaviors of other women. However, previous researchers have not extensively examined how young women perceive their own eating pathologies. Among college-aged women, eating disorders are extremely prevalent, but many of these individuals attribute their disordered eating to the normal stress of college. Of the very small percentage of women who do seek treatment, an even smaller percentage seek help specifically for an eating disorder. This lack of self-identification is deeply problematic because timely identification and treatment of an eating disorder is essential for maximizing the chances of a successful recovery.

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The Weakest Link

June 06, 2017.
  • Melinda Parrish

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

     by Melinda Parrish, plus size model and body positivity advocate in recovery from Binge Eating Disorder. She lives in Washington, D.C. Follow her at https://www.instagram.com/melparrishplus/.

    To some degree, it’s fair to say that the military “trained” me for Binge Eating Disorder.

    To be clear, I’m a huge supporter of the military and am incredibly honored to have served. I have deep reverence for the military and everyone serving. But the reality is that 34% of women in the military suffer from eating disorders, much more than the percentage of women in the general population.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program