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Articles tagged with: Eating Disorders

Gratitude for Primary Care Physicians

September 20, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    Over the past few weeks I have started rounding on a pediatric inpatient unit with Drs Gillespie and Rome, adolescent medicine specialists who we are privileged to work closely with. It has been a new experience for me to work with patients at the medical inpatient level of care. Upon admit, these clients and families often are in a state of extraordinary surprise, confusion, and fear. They may have gone to their physician thinking everything was alright, then learned their heart rate was low, EKG was abnormal, or electrolytes were off balance. Instead of going home with a prescription or reassurance, they find themselves in a hospital with fears about the things that might happen next. As I have sat with these patients and their families I have had an awareness of what it means to be a pediatrician or family medicine provider – to be the first person to see the eating disorder, its negative physical consequences and to give news to families and patients that is so new, painful, and frightening. Once a patient is at an eating disorder treatment center they are already halfway to knowing what is happening and what they need treatment. While our work here is often difficult it has been profound to stand as the line of first defense. I am so appreciative of the work these physicians do and their abilities to transition patients into life saving treatment.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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Snacks and Meals to Fuel Your Body This School Year at College

September 19, 2013.
  • Fast, Simple, and Nutritious Snacks and Meals to Fuel Your Body This School Year

    By: Sina Teskey, RD, LD, CSO

    School is officially back in session. Whether you live on campus or off campus it is still important to think about how you can prepare for the school year in regard to nutrition. With schedules varying each day and lots of studying you will want to be prepped with snacks and easy meal ideas to make packing for class simple and quick. Here are some snack ideas to toss in your bag before you head out.

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We Want Your Feedback

September 16, 2013.
  • It's time once again for the annual Emily Program Client Satisfaction Survey and we want your feedback!

    TEP Tote BagEach year we ask clients to share their thoughts and recommendations with The Emily Program. The feedback will help us continue to develop programming and enhance client experience.

    The survey is open to all TEP clients at all locations. It runs from today (9/16) through Monday, September 30. Please be sure to share your feedback soon.

    As a thank you for your time, we invite clients to enter a drawing for one of five The Emily Program canvas tote bags.*

    Click HERE to take the survey now.

    *Please note that the contact information you provide for this prize drawing will not be connected to your survey responses in any way.

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Woodbury Now Open

September 03, 2013.
  • The Emily Program Woodbury Eating Disorder Treatment Group RoomThe Emily Program is excited to announce that our new Woodbury, MN office is officially open.

    We are currently taking referrals and new clients in need of eating disorder treatment. Call us at (651) 645-5323. We believe that with the right treatment, recovery is possible.

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Fall 2013 Group Catalog Available Online

August 23, 2013.
  • The Emily Program Minneapolis-St. Paul GroupsOur new and improved group catalog will be in The Emily Program Minneapolis-St. Paul locations soon. For now, please feel free to click here to peruse all the offerings.

    Here are some of the changes you'll notice in the fall catalog:

    • The layout. We hope you will find this catalog easier to navigate.The Emily Program Minneapolis-St. Paul Groups
    • Number of ongoing groups. Almost all of our groups are now ongoing. This should make joining a group easier. Our Body Image, Connections, DBT, and Tools for Couples are the only groups that have start and end dates. Talk with your individual therapist soon to get involved with those groups.
    • Woodbury. Our newest Twin Cities location, Woodbury, is included in this catalog.

    Watch the lobbies of our Twin Cities locations after Labor Day for the printed copies of the catalog.

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CEU Networking Breakfast & Workshop

August 20, 2013.
  • The Emily Program and The Retreat have partnered to present "Exploring Positive Body Image." CEUs are available for LADC and Social Workers.

    When: September 17 from 8:00-10:30 AM
    Where: The Retreat, Wayzata, MN

    While addressing addiction, providers often find themselves addressing co-occurring body image concerns and disordered eating behavior. This workshop will explore and offer suggestions for promoting positive body image and self-esteem, while encouraging optimal health and well-being through joyful activity, nutrition and self-care.

    Dr. Jillian Lampert, The Emily Program's senior director of business and community development, will discuss how providers can recognize and become more confident in addressing positive body image with clients dealing with co-occuring disorders.

    RSVP to Peggy at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Seating is limited.

    Download the flyer for more information about this event.

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The Need for Evidence Based Care

August 09, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    A recent article by Dr. Russell Marx, The National Eating Disorder Association's chief science officer, discussed evidence based treatment. The article noted Harriet Brown's New York Times piece, which we have discussed in previous blogs, concerning why surprisingly few patients get evidence based care. Dr. Marx discusses the NICE guidelines, which is the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom. What's particularly exciting about this article was that it noted the growing evidence for the efficacy of FBT and general family based interventions for clients with anorexia. The NICE guidelines are of significance specifically in the United Kingdom but are utilized worldwide in understanding evidence basis for eating disorder treatment. In the NICE guidelines Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is noted as a treatment well conducted with clinical studies for binge eating disorder, but is not included as a proven treatment for anorexia or bulimia. These guidelines were last completed in 2011 and will be reviewed again in 2014. It is our hope that recent studies on DBT will show the effectiveness of this treatment for other eating disorder diagnoses.

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Validation

August 02, 2013.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Samantha Mishne, LISW, LICDC

    Recently a client kept telling me how invalidating I was. Instead of getting defensive and saying all the things I was thinking in my head which I knew were not validating, I took a validation course. Recently when I was taking an online training the facilitator and a colleague both commented on how validating I was. I share this because it just goes to show when you take in feedback you can teach an old dog new tricks. Given this feedback, I am going to stop invalidating myself and start validating myself by telling people, "I am validating." Remember you can validate others and yourself.

    Why did I need to take in this feedback and learn to become more validating? I wish I could tell you it was because I wanted to be more adherent to dialectical behavioral therapy which is about pushing for change and validation, however it was more self-serving. As I say to the young people I work with: "validation makes people want to do things for you." Yes, it also shows that you understand, are listening, and want to tend to the relationship. Once I realized that to validate someone does not mean you agree with them, it became easy to validate. Remember you can only validate the valid.

    How do you validate someone? You make eye contact, stay focused and show that you are actively listening which is hard, you may need to put down your electronic devices in order to do this. Next be mindful of your verbal and nonverbal reactions, which for me is my tone. Try and identify how the other person is feeling and name that feeling. Yes, you might be wrong, but at least they will know you are trying to help them express their feelings. Try and find the kernel of truth in what the other person is saying. Lastly respond in a way that shows you are taking them seriously. We validate ourselves the same way-observe how we are feeling, reflect those feelings back, and look for how those feelings make sense. Remember validation also increases people's willingness. Whenever a client validates me, I feel my motivation increasing; I am more attentive and in turn more validating.

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Parent Conversations and Adolescent Disordered Eating Behaviors

July 26, 2013. Read more

Helping Children Love Their Bodies & Themselves

July 17, 2013.
  • Talking to children about health instead of weight has been a popular topic since the University of Minnesota released their study. It's incredibly important to equip kids with the skills they need to understand the messages they receive from various media and other external sources.

    Marti and Erin from Mom Enough asked Dr. Jillian Lampert, TEP's Senior Director of Business and Community Development, to talk more about how parents can approach these conversations. Jillian offers three things you can do to help your children make healthy choices and appreciate their bodies.

    Click here to listen to the interview.

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Building Eating Disorder Awareness

July 02, 2013.
  • Last week was a great week for eating disorder awareness.

    The media outlets reported on the new University of Minnesota study that found there is a lesser chance of children developing disordered eating or an eating disorder when their parents talk to them about being healthy rather than their shape or size.

    You can read more about this from the Star Tribune or check out the FOX9 News story that aired last week.

    This is an important topic and could help change the conversations we all have with our families and friends. Positive conversations begin with us as individuals – “health” can be found and maintained by people of all shapes and sizes. Changing the conversation begins with each of us promoting health and wellness instead of dieting, shame, and striving for an unrealistic "ideal" body.

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Radical Truth

June 14, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    One of the saddest and complicated components of an eating disorder is how it encourages secrets. Behaviors, negative thoughts, feelings of shame, and the pain one carries often happen in secret. By the time someone presents for treatment they are so familiar and so used to keeping secrets that it can be very difficult to tell the truth. Keeping secrets is not a failure, a betrayal, or an attempt by a patient to trick or fool a therapist or loved one. Keeping secrets is part of the illness. In treatment we need to work on revealing secrets, on becoming more honest and finding ways to speak truths, even though those truths may feel that they expose us. They may expose how ill we really are, the sadness we carry, the obsessions of our minds, our fears that we will never recover, or past events that we wish were not true. The pain of holding secrets is too great and holding them only make us sicker and less likely to receive the help we need. Like radical acceptance, treatment requires radical honesty for patients, therapists, and loved ones. Speaking our truths and being honest both in treatment and with oneself is truly a key to recovery.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

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Minneapolis-St. Paul Summer Groups Start Soon

May 28, 2013.
  • The Minneapolis-St. Paul summer group catalog is out and includes descriptions of all of our ongoing outpatient groups and a number of new groups being offered during summer quarter.

    For clients who participate in intensive programs at our St. Louis Park office, this season also brings a pilot program that let’s you choose various groups to attend during your program day.  To get involved with any group, please speak with your individual therapist.  They can help you determine the group(s) that will be fit your needs and help get you signed up.

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Dr. Wisniewski Receives AED Outstanding Clinician Award!

May 17, 2013.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    CCED is very proud to announce our very own Lucene Wisniewski, PhD, received the 2013 Outstanding Clinician Award from the Academy for Eating Disorders "for her contributions to the clinical care and well-being of individuals with eating disorders through clinical contributions to the field."

    "I feel really lucky to be part of this community of experts in eating disorder treatment," Dr. Wisniewski said during her acceptance speech. "On a day-to-day basis, if I feel stuck with a patient, I can call people literally all over the world because of this group. I have learned so much from being a part of the AED, and it is just an honor to receive this award."

    Dr. Wisniewski was honored during an award's ceremony at this year's International Conference on Eating Disorders, Crossing Disciplinary Boundaries in Eating Disorders, held in Montreal, May 2 – 4. During her acceptance speech, she joked that the irony of this award is the fact that she never wanted to be a clinician. So, she offered the audience one piece of advice: Take the opportunities that come to you, even if you don't think they will lead you down what you think is your desired path.

    Watch Dr. Wisniewski receiving her award live at the AED's award ceremony below. Her acceptance speech begins at timestamp 5:45.

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Willfulness vs. Willingness

May 10, 2013.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

    By Samantha Mishne, LISW-S, LICDC

    How do you move from a willful place to a willing place? I remind myself willingness is not a thing or a place; it is instead a view on life. Life is happening all around and I can either be willing to accept the change or feedback I receive, or I can be willful and in turn stay miserable, or say "yes, but". I think about this often with the clients I sit with who are asked or sometimes forced to make changes that are often times reinforced by the world we live in. The strength that they exhibit to move to a willing place is inspiring. I say to the young people who participate in family based treatment, your parents are going to reefed you, so you can either stay willful or move to a willing place. The nourishment that food provides often increased people's ability to a move to a willing place along with parents resolve to care for their children.

    When trying to increase willingness the first thing I do is really try and listen to what it is that someone thinks or wants me to do, then I pro and con making the changes vs. staying the same. Ultimately what moves me to a willingness place is being witness to the change my clients make daily and my acceptance that change is constant. Though I say often that I do not like change the older I get the more I am realizing it is constant. You can only push a way for so long before you need to be willing. It is important to note that there are no shades of gray when it comes to willingness. Currently I am pushing away the water stain on my ceiling because I know I have a leak which I need to become willing to have someone come out and fix. Yes this is not as big an issue (no pun intended) as gaining weight, increasing meal plan compliance, not exercising . . .but it is an example of how every day we are faced with a choice to be willing or willful and we must accept the consequences. I will let you know if my ceiling falls in because I have yet to move to a willing place.

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program