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Articles tagged with: Eating Disorders

Day Treatment vs. IOP – What’s the difference?

September 15, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Like many other eating disorder facilities, The Emily Program offers multiple levels of care for adolescents and adults. What makes The Emily Program different is that our services are based in outpatient treatment. As The Emily Program founder Dirk Miller says, "We didn't start as an inpatient program and develop outpatient services to support that model. The reason is pretty simple: most change occurs as an outpatient. We live our lives as 'outpatients.' Ultimately we must apply what's learned to a life of recovery that we live outside the treatment program."

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Cleveland NEDA Walk: Walk alongside TEP in the fight against eating disorders

September 10, 2015.
  • CLEVELAND OHIO NEDAWalk2014 685x685The Emily Program-Cleveland staff at the 2014 NEDA Walk

    In this country, it's estimated that 30 million men and women will suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder during their lifetime.

    Join The Emily Program in the fight against eating disorders and saving lives. On Saturday, Oct. 10, members of TEP will walk in the Cleveland NEDA (National Eating Disorders Association) Walk to raise funds and awareness about the dangers of eating disorders, and the importance of early intervention and treatment.

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The Last Vestiges of Self-Harm

September 08, 2015.
  • photo of a Smiley Face 685x420

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Clare Harmon, a former Emily Program client and woman in recovery

    Confession: Until a few weeks ago, I hadn't had my teeth cleaned in over ten years.

    Like many people, my fear of the dentist was cemented at an early age (this comes to mind). The dentist's office terrified: a noxiously lighted chamber in which the slightest transgression (you only floss twice a day and not after every meal?!) met the harshest punishment. I hated it. I hated the small talk, the smug dentist and his lackey, the self-satisfied hygienist. I hated the power trips and the authority and the "we know what's best for your body" rhetoric. When I left for college, I artfully dodged my bi-yearly check-ups. On several occasions, I actually reorganized gig schedules to conflict with appointments made months in advance.

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Athletes and Eating Disorders

September 03, 2015.
  • Athletes EatingDisorders Blog685x350

    Female and Male Athletes are Susceptible to Disordered Eating

    While sports and exercise are excellent ways to improve mental and physical health, grow self-esteem, and build relationships, the fact that athletes carry risk factors for disordered eating is one that shouldn't be ignored. What makes athletes vulnerable to eating disorders? What should coaches, trainers, parents, and peers look out for?

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Talking About Recovery

August 27, 2015. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • BirdTracksinSand Isla 2013 685x375

    Lately, I've wondered what we mean when we talk about recovery. Some people use the term "recovered," others say "recovery," and yet others don't use either. When someone enters into treatment, either that person or their loved ones want to know our success rate. Of course, this presents the question, "Success as measured by what?" As a field, we are at a loss on this question.

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Clients' Thoughts About Recovery

August 18, 2015.
  • By Dr. Mark Warren and clients at TEP

    Recovery from an eating disorder is the clear goal of treatment, however, the scientific literature on clients' experience of recovery is often defined in different ways. In general, the literature tends to focus on re-feeding, growth curves, medical stability, and resolution of behaviors. At TEP we fully endorse that these are the first steps towards recovery and without them no discussion of recovery can take place. That being said, recovery from an eating disorder can have various meanings for those who suffer from these illnesses. In general, there are psychological, social, and identity issues that also change when someone describes themself as being in recovery. We feel it is important to talk to our clients and their families to gain understanding of what recovery means to them. With this in mind we had a conversation with clients about this issue. We asked them to answer the question "How do i know if I am in recovery?" Please find their responses below:

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The Practice of Yoga

August 13, 2015.
  • photo of rolled up yoga mats 685x385

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    A few years ago, I dropped in to a yoga class in my neighborhood. I had not been to this class before, and I did not know the teacher, but the class was on a sliding scale fee and I was a graduate student, and I knew I loved the way that yoga can help me feel present in my body while also calming my mind. So I showed up right on time, unrolled my mat alongside the other yogis, and settled in to a comfortable child's pose, waiting for the teacher to arrive and for class to start. The moments before a class are my favorite; I can sink into a gentle stretch and let my body and mind begin to let go of the tension of the day.

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Complimentary Professional Eating Disorder CEU Events in Minnesota and Washington

August 06, 2015.
  • At The Emily Program, we enjoy sharing our knowledge of eating disorders with other community professionals. Over the coming weeks we will be holding two free CEU events for professionals who'd like to learn more about the treatment of eating disorders.

    More information about the Woodbury, MN and Lacey, WA events is available below. We hope you can join us. RSVP soon. Seating is limited.

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Eating Disorders Are Not A Teenage Phase

August 04, 2015.
  •  photo of two groups of Teenagers 685x343

    Acknowledging the facts about eating disorders

    In the not so distant past, eating disorders weren't recognized by society - or even some medical professionals - as legitimate diseases. In fact, binge eating disorder wasn't added to the eating disorder portion of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) until 2013, despite being the most common eating disorder in the United States.

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Yoga: Child's Pose Variations

July 30, 2015.
  • Yoga Blog Image

    Today's TEP yoga blog focuses on a pose taught often in yoga classes, child's pose. You may often hear a teacher say "Child's pose is a pose you can come to at any time throughout your practice". That is a nice option! And child's pose is not accessible to everyone, nor is it everyone's resting pose. For some, the traditional version can feel like a grounding, safe, comfortable and resting pose, but for many it can feel uncomfortable in the hips, knees and breath. Perhaps these variations will speak to you. If they don't that's OK too!

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Living Moderation in a City of Extremes, Part 5: Neither “Big” Nor “Easy”

July 28, 2015.
  • C.Harmon Midcity Bayou St. John sunset

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Clare Harmon, a former Emily Program client and woman in recovery

    A dear colleague recently pointed out to me—in a conversation regarding this experience—"you're right you know, New Orleans ain't that big and it ain't that easy." Indeed. I might start calling the crescent city the "Lil' Arduous."

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Gardening & Nature as Therapy

July 23, 2015.
  • photo of a hiking trail

    By Dana Rademacher, intern at The Emily Program

    "Gardening is the most therapeutic and defiant act you can do...plus you get strawberries." -Ron Finley, Ted Talk: A guerilla gardener in South Central LA

    Let's be honest here for a second, I do not have the best track record when it comes to gardening and caring for plant life. I always get excited by the idea of gardening, but when push comes to shove, I'm just no good at keeping anything alive. I have the opposite of a green thumb if there is such a thing. Being busy between work and school, it is hard to find time to learn which plants are best for the climate, which fertilizer to use or to even pay attention to the rain-to-sun ratio every day.

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What I'm Learning About Food From My One-Year Old

July 16, 2015.
  •  photo of a variety of foods on a plate

    This is one person's story; everyone will have unique experiences on their own path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors or symptom use. Please use your own discretion. And speak with your therapist when needed.

    By Liz Rognes, a former Emily Program client in recovery. She is a teacher, writer, and musician who lives in Spokane, WA.

    My one-year old son loves mealtime. He sits in his high chair, picks up a piece of macaroni or an orange or pieces of fish, brings it to his mouth, and then looks at me with big eyes and says, "Mmm!" He takes another bite and again exclaims, "Mmm!" If his dad is in the room, he'll say, "Dada?" and my partner will say, "Yeah, buddy?" and he'll say, "Mmm!" He wants to communicate with us, to share his happiness about this food he's eating. He marvels at the new and familiar tastes, he looks at me with joyful surprise when he feels a new texture, and he claps his hands when he sees me preparing one of his favorite foods.

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Enjoy the Summer With These Non-Food Related Activities

July 09, 2015.
  • Sunset PalmTrees Maui 685x385

    By Dana Rademacher, intern at The Emily Program

    "Rest isn't idleness. To lie outside in summer listening to water murmur, or watching clouds float, is hardly a waste of time. – J. Lubbock"

    Ah, summer, you are finally here! As the dog days of summer are fast approaching, people start taking more vacations, going to the beach, and spending as much time relaxing with loved ones as possible. Unfortunately, the summertime isn't a fun and relaxing season for all, especially when you are struggling with an eating disorder or another mental illness such as depression or anxiety. It can be filled with a perceived pressure to have the busiest, most exciting summer ever, with added pressure to look "perfect" or "bikini ready." These types of pressure aren't beneficial for anyone. To help combat these summer stressors, here are a few non-food related ideas to help you relax and have more summer fun!

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program