Get help. Refer a patient. Find hope. 888-364-5977

888-EMILY-77

Get help. Refer a patient.
Find hope. 888-364-5977

Welcome

There’s Help. There’s Hope! The Emily Program is a warm and welcoming place where individuals and their families can find comprehensive treatment for eating disorders and related issues. This blog is a place for us to share the latest happenings at The Emily Program, as well as helpful tidbits from the broader eating disorder community.

We want to hear your story. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and ask how you can become a contributor!

Parent Conversations and Adolescent Disordered Eating Behaviors

July 26, 2013. Read more

Join the Crafting Club

July 17, 2013.
  • Do you enjoy making jewelry, scrapbooking, knitting, crocheting, painting, or other art and craft activities?

    Join the Crafting Club -- a social group of current and former Emily Program clients who gather on a regular basis to practice art and craft activities. It's a great time to practice your art or craft, meet new people, and connect with those you already know.

    The Craft Club meets once per month to enjoy each other's company and be creative. Current and former Emily Program clients are welcome to participate. All you need is an interest in learning and doing arts and crafts.

    There is no cost, no pre-registration, and no commitment to attend.

    When: 2nd Saturday of each month
    Where: 2265 Como Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108
    Time: 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

    You can stay the whole time or show up for part of the time. Please bring your own supplies for the project(s) you are working on.

Read more

Helping Children Love Their Bodies & Themselves

July 17, 2013.
  • Talking to children about health instead of weight has been a popular topic since the University of Minnesota released their study. It's incredibly important to equip kids with the skills they need to understand the messages they receive from various media and other external sources.

    Marti and Erin from Mom Enough asked Dr. Jillian Lampert, TEP's Senior Director of Business and Community Development, to talk more about how parents can approach these conversations. Jillian offers three things you can do to help your children make healthy choices and appreciate their bodies.

    Click here to listen to the interview.

Read more

Building Eating Disorder Awareness

July 02, 2013.
  • Last week was a great week for eating disorder awareness.

    The media outlets reported on the new University of Minnesota study that found there is a lesser chance of children developing disordered eating or an eating disorder when their parents talk to them about being healthy rather than their shape or size.

    You can read more about this from the Star Tribune or check out the FOX9 News story that aired last week.

    This is an important topic and could help change the conversations we all have with our families and friends. Positive conversations begin with us as individuals – “health” can be found and maintained by people of all shapes and sizes. Changing the conversation begins with each of us promoting health and wellness instead of dieting, shame, and striving for an unrealistic "ideal" body.

Read more

Radical Truth

June 14, 2013. Written by Mark Warren, M.D.
  • Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partneredin 2014.

    By Dr. Mark Warren

    One of the saddest and complicated components of an eating disorder is how it encourages secrets. Behaviors, negative thoughts, feelings of shame, and the pain one carries often happen in secret. By the time someone presents for treatment they are so familiar and so used to keeping secrets that it can be very difficult to tell the truth. Keeping secrets is not a failure, a betrayal, or an attempt by a patient to trick or fool a therapist or loved one. Keeping secrets is part of the illness. In treatment we need to work on revealing secrets, on becoming more honest and finding ways to speak truths, even though those truths may feel that they expose us. They may expose how ill we really are, the sadness we carry, the obsessions of our minds, our fears that we will never recover, or past events that we wish were not true. The pain of holding secrets is too great and holding them only make us sicker and less likely to receive the help we need. Like radical acceptance, treatment requires radical honesty for patients, therapists, and loved ones. Speaking our truths and being honest both in treatment and with oneself is truly a key to recovery.

    Contributions by Sarah Emerman

Read more

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Recovery for life is possible 888-364-5977

Recovery for life is possible

888-364-5977

The Emily Program